Small floral shirt dress, take 2

This one is much improved compared to last time.

A younger, slimmer and more beautiful model helps.

Technical details

Pattern: Burdastyle 04-2011-107

Size: 36-44. I made a 38 with a FBA. That added a vertical bust dart, although its not at all noticeable in this fabric.

Fabric: Light to medium weight cotton.

Changes I made:

It’s a nice design, although a raised gathered waist does not show off Felicity’s slender waist. The buttons continue all the way down the front but are in a double placket on the skirt piece. The style showcases raw edges- on the standing collar, button placket, at the waistline and hem and on the sleeve edges.

I shortened the sleeves and omitted the raw edge on the skirt top, sleeves and hems.

I did leave the standing collar as a raw edge. The centre front placket is a raw edge too, but being cut on the bias, the rawness is a bit more restrained.

I also changed the buttonholes to be horizontal rather than vertical. They are less likely to cause a wardrobe malfunction that way!

You can see that I’ve also still got one buttonhole to make and one more button to sew on to the collar. I used an extra button on the skirt instead. Must get back to the button shop!

I changed the inseam pockets to bags, rather than sewn onto the front skirt as in the pattern. Who doesn’t love pockets?!

The bodice ends a few cms above the waist and the skirt is a gathered rectangle. This is a style that looks good on small busted tall columns. For someone with the length, but all in her legs rather than her torso, and with a generously proportioned bust, I think it looks better with a belt.

There,  ready for church with my belt and my shoes (can’t wait until she is buying her own stuff and I am borrowing it!).

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10 Responses to Small floral shirt dress, take 2

  1. Karin says:

    It’s lovely with the belt and shoes! Yes, everything does look wonderful on teenagers, sigh.

  2. That’s so pretty! You’re right about the belt. The raw edges are an interesting feature too.

  3. prttynpnk says:

    How lovely she looks- what perfect fabric for her coloring and I love the shape on her- classic and feminine. That collar detail is really interesting. I wonder if you could do it on the placket too….

    • SewingElle says:

      That these colours looked so good on her was an epiphany for me. She is not a mini me. But I had thought she was because she is not a fair skinned red head like He who Cooks.
      It seems there is plenty of diversity in the old genepool. She has brown eyes like her Dad, and slightly more olive skin than I or he. Colours that look meh on me look wow on her. It’s only taken 14 years to work this out…

  4. sewbussted says:

    Your daughter looks so cute. Lady like but not so much so that she looks dated. Really nice!

  5. Kbenco says:

    The collar and placket details are interesting on this otherwise classic dress. Your daughter looks lovely in it.

  6. Tia Dia says:

    This is so pretty, and I know what you mean about younger models! I love the raw edges – it’s a great finishing technique that I need to make more use of. The dress looks lovely both with and without a belt, but that red does make the entire dress pop!

  7. Pella says:

    The dress is very pretty on the model! A perfect fit too.

  8. ooobop! says:

    I love this dress. With or without belt… its soooo pretty. I’ve been looking forward to seeing this made up. The only thing I’m struggling with is the raw edge. I know it looks good but I can’t ever bring myself to do it… call me old fashioned!!!!

    • SewingElle says:

      I’m a bit the same. I don’t mind the raw edges on the bias placket, but on the straight grain or close to it on the stand collar it does look a bit wrong to me.
      I couldn’t bring myself to attach the skirt with a raw edge. That seam is properly on the inside and overlocked!

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