More skirts: getting good value from my BurdaStyle subscription

Peace

and flowers

Two simple cotton skirts.

One sweet daughter.

Third time this pattern has been used.

The first time was red stripes in the New Year.

Technical details

Pattern: BurdaStyle 02-2010-104B.

Size: 34-44. I made a 38.

Fabrics: Cotton twill (peace) and light cotton shirting (small floral).

Changes I made:

The peace skirt was made almost exactly as Burda said to make it. It’s a lovely classic A-line style.

I didn’t add the ribbon and buckle detail on the pocket edges Burda suggested, but I did add a thin white ribbon to define the edge. Without this, the peace signs were a little overwhelming and made the skirt look a bit too ‘crafty’.

To add some rigidity to the waist seam of the yokes, I included a 2 cm ribbon when I stitched the facing to the yoke. I didn’t use interfacing in the yoke but instead used an extra layer of the fabric. This made for a softer finish for the yoke, and with the ribbon, shouldn’t stretch out of shape. Time will tell if this works!

The small floral skirt started from the same pattern but was morphed into a gathered skirt with a front yoke and an elastic waist at the back.

With the belt pushed up in this photo, you can see the flat front yoke, the gathered elasticised back waistband and the ric rac embellishing the pockets.

The ric rac is totally lost in the busy floral pattern but Felicity and I know it is there. It is from her great grandmothers notion stash, so that adds a nostalgic touch!

How did I go from classic A-line to this? I’m not convinced my “notes” are all that helpful, but this is what I recorded:

Translation: To the front pattern piece I added 20cm extra width to the middle and then gathered this onto the front yoke. I started the gathers after the inside pocket bags. I think it might have looked better if the gathers extended further across the front. Note to self for next version!

The back was cut out as an almost rectangle 73 cm wide by same length as the original pattern. That’s what I’m trying to illustrate in the drawing above. It was an almost rectangle because I curved it up at the top and bottom towards the sides by about the same curvature as the front piece.

The back waistband was a 73 cm by 10 cm rectangle. 15 mm seam allowances are included for all these measurements.

This is how I made the back elasticised waist.

I sewed the back waistband onto the back piece, finished the edge with over locking and then attached a 35 cm long piece of 3 cm wide elastic, using several rows of stitching and stretching as I sewed. Peter from Male Pattern Boldness has a fabulous tutorial on doing this in his boxer sew along series and I pretty much did exactly what he said.

Then I turned the elastic over so that it was enclosed inside the “waistband” and added another row or two to keep it all in place. The front (already gathered, pockets added and yoke attached) and back were stitched together and then the inner front yoke was attached. Hemmed, pressed, stray threads cut and it was ready to go!

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3 Responses to More skirts: getting good value from my BurdaStyle subscription

  1. Gail says:

    The skirts look great. Is that a Burda blouse I’m seeing too?

  2. Carolyn says:

    Those skirts are both so lovely! Your daughter looks gorgeous in both of them, she is lucky to have such a creative mother to make her things…
    Thanks for your lovely comment on my bathers, and don’t worry; the black thing is just a guy swimming with his boogie board… !

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