Twisted Shoulders and Silver Circles

I really loved the Dec 2011 BurdaStyle. Full of lovely red Christmassy frocks, gorgeous green evening dresses and tweedy English winter styles. None of it suitable for Australian Decembers or my lifestyle needs but still..

One of the beautiful green silk bias cut frocks was also available as a top. The style lines looked very interesting as did the pattern pieces and construction. The top was shown in both a satin version and a challis version. Getting closer to daywear and more likely to work in my wardrobe than that gorgeous green evening dress..

I had a white cotton batiste with metallic silver circles. Perhaps this pattern and my top would make an interesting and cool Christmas top?

Well, sewing plans and sewing time rarely line up and the top was then intended to be a New Years Eve top rather than a Christmas top. That was, if I also had time to make a white linen skirt. Which I did not.

And I still have not.

Hence the photos on Eliza the dressmaking dummy, rather than me.

One thing I didn’t pick up from the photos nor from the pattern is what an extreme plunging neckline it has, even after adding a button and loop. Lucky I’m not overly blessed in boobage, because then it would be cleavage city.

The back has a similar deep V.

Another interesting feature of this style is the shoulders.

I think I like this top but I haven’t yet worn it, partly because of the neckline and the paintbrush shoulders but also because it is still an orphan. Lovely fabric though!

Technical details

Pattern: BurdaStyle 12-2011-122A

Size: 36-44, I made a 42 through to the waist, grading out to 44 over the hips

Fabric: Cotton batiste with metallic circles from Gay Naffine this spring.

Changes I made:

I made this up exactly as Burda said until I tried it on. Then I added a button and loop to make the neckline slightly less revealing.

If I made it again I would sew the shoulders together in a regular manner (that is, with the raw edges inside. Burda almost did this for the other version of the top 12-2011-122B. I don’t mind the raw edge look but the paintbrush look is not so appealing. There was a similar twisted shoulder style in the May 2011 issue of BurdaStyle (05-2011-107B), although in a knit and with a ruched bodice. This might be a better interpretation of this style, at least for me.

This is a very easy project. The main challenge is keeping track of the fronts and backs on the (four!) underarm gussets and sewing them to the correct main pattern pieces.

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5 Responses to Twisted Shoulders and Silver Circles

  1. Judith says:

    Didn’t realise you are a fellow ‘Aussie’ – know what you mean about the BurdaStyle being out of alignment with our needs.
    Love your top, it is unique and the fabric gorgeous. The paintbrush effect is most unusual and a real ‘Burda’ design feature…

  2. Audrey says:

    What neat fabric! I had admired the pattern when I got that issue, but I didn’t notice the way the shoulders were sewn.It is sort of interesting. The top is so pretty and looks like it would be so cool and comfortable to wear on a hot day.

  3. Mary Nanna says:

    Huh! I was just looking at that pattern last night – and noticed in most of this issue the woman are sans underwear, the thought of which on me made me burst out laughing! I did think about the pattern that I could wear underwear if I didn’t slice as far down the front or back since it seems to me to be a clip and turn job, yes?

    In other matters our summer this year has been miserable and I haven’t had much opportunity to go sleeveless, so this top can wait – thanks for sharing your version.

  4. What unusual details. And really pretty fabric! I hope you get to wear this one soon.

  5. Emily says:

    I saw this too but haven’t organised myself. Will have to figure out the underwear options when done I think!

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