Seafoam striped skirt with a repurposed zip gives new life to an Oscar de la Renta denim jacket

This denim jacket has been languishing in my wardrobe for about ten years. It was made with an Oscar de la Renta Vogue Pattern and a stretch denim bought in Tampere, Finland (my brother worked for Nokia for a while, and we visited them; fabric and notions have been my souvenir of choice for a long time!)

It’s a boxy shape that didn’t seem to work with the rest of my clothes. And I seem to have more black than navy. But it had nice metal buttons and it was me-made, so I didn’t donate it.

The skirt happened because I *had* to go to my local fabric store for something else, and this seafoam striped remnant needed a new home

The metal zip used to reside in a pair of shorts of He who Cooks. Now it’s an exposed zip feature to match the grosgrain ribbon waistband. Yes, that button is on the wrong side of the waistband.

It doesn’t look quite as wrinkly in real life, but the fabric is very stretchy woven and probably should have been lined (and interfaced down the zip). I used a double needle for the hem, because of the stretchiness.

Technical details

Jacket Pattern: Vogue 2518 (now out of print) Vogue American Designer Oscar de la Renta (2001)

The pattern envelope describes it as a loose-fitting, fully interfaced, unlined, above-hip jacket. I used no interfacing anywhere, even where I should have, like in the facing. I think I have progressed a little in my sewing skills over the years!

Size: I made 14. Looking at it now, I think it’s a bit big. It used to have shoulder pads. At some time in the last ten years I took them out.

Why is it pulling up in the front in the side view? Any ideas? Forward rolling or rounded shoulders? I’ve had this before with boxy jackets.

Skirt Pattern: BurdaStyle 04-2010-125 without the flounce in a size 42 waist 44 hips, same as this one. This has become my go to simple skirt pattern.

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10 Responses to Seafoam striped skirt with a repurposed zip gives new life to an Oscar de la Renta denim jacket

  1. sewbussted says:

    A fresh new skirt for your jacket! Great detail with the zip and grosgrain touch.

  2. Judith says:

    Beautiful, fresh fabric for the skirt – just ready for Spring wearing!!! And love the jacket – glad you have held onto it as it works well with the skirt – love the overall look…

  3. kaitui_kiwi says:

    Yay for spring sewing! I can’t help with the pulling problem but I will agree that fabric is the best souvenir! I really like the re-used exposed zipper on the skirt, it’s a great finishing touch. Also how great to still be wearing something you made 10 years ago? Awesome!

  4. Stop having clothes I want to steal! :). I think the reason your jacket is pulling back is that some designers don’t allow for (whisper) boobs. They design for walking coathangers and when a curve arrives they don’t know how to deal with them.

    Also, don’t pay too much attention about how you look in photos – in real life you would never stand sideways to someone with your arms at the side!

  5. Karin says:

    Wonderful Spring skirt! It makes me think of ice-cream, yum:-)

  6. Pingback: Squares or circles? | He Cooks… She Sews!

  7. Mercedes says:

    Maybe a fba (full bust alteration) helps to solve this problem.

  8. Glynne says:

    Hi,

    Correct placement of shoulder pads will sort the riding up at the front problem as it sets the shoulders so the back doesn’t pull down. I realise shoulder pads are not fashionable but they do serve a specific purpose in jackets like these. When designers like Oscar de la Renata put them in it is usually to ensure the garment sits correctly rather than being a fashion statement in themselves (ala the eighties overkill of shoulder pads).

    • SewingElle says:

      Thanks for that insight. The jacket did have shoulder pads, but they were not good quality ones so I removed them. I can’t remember how it looked with the pads in, but probably better!

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