Psychedelic ‘zebra’ skirt and friends

That’s enough chatter from the fabrics. Let’s talk about the skirt!

It’s bright.

Sunnies on?

Right, let’s go for it.

Here shamelessly trying to convince Ann that’s it Jungle January worthy by adding a Toucan pendant. Of course she will be too discerning to be fooled by that!

Fully Busted’s version on Pattern Review of skirt 137 from the January 2011 issue of BurdaStyle was the starting point.

Look at the fashion photo of this skirt:

What’s not to love? A stylish woman in a kitchen with a chef or two.

This photo-shoot was just made for a blog called He Cooks…she Sews…

Skirt

Pattern: BurdaStyle 01-2011-137

I left the top stitching around the hem off for my version. My fabric has enough going for it!

Size 44-52, I made a 44 with no adjustments. I usually make a sway back adjustment on a 42 waist and then grade out to a 44 at the hips. The flat pattern measures looked like a 44 might be okay (too much food over Christmas!) and those double darts at the back suggested a sway back adjustment wasn’t needed. So I rashly cut the fabric out without any changes. Silk Chiffon sniffed that this was clearly a toile, not a real garment, so perhaps using Ikea fabric wasn’t such a bad idea.

Fabric: Cotton Twill home dec fabric from Ikea lined with acetate.

The Ikea fabric has a huge pattern repeat and I only purchased 1.5 metres. So no chance of matching at the seams if I wanted to be symmetric across my bodies with those zigzags!

The back is almost acceptable,

but the side seams are not. Sad face indeed.

It has pockets!

And what about the top you ask? Why does it have Where’s Wally (Wheres Waldo) sleeves? You are wondering why I didn’t take notice of the sensible comment on the last post about matching this very loud skirt with a solid coloured top?

I really have no excuses, but this top is sort of fun with this skirt…maybe? And I wanted to give this pattern another try, and I had a striped remnant in my stash, and it was clamouring for some attention… I really do need to tell my fabrics to behave better, don’t I?

Top

Pattern: BurdaStyle 02-2013-126

Size: 34-42, I made a 42

Fabric: White cotton spandex knit from Gorgeous Fabrics and red and white cotton knit from Gay Naffine. The white knit is much lighter and drapier than the stripe, but they are playing together nicely (although if nicely also means stylishly, then you could well disagree..).

Changes I made:

I shortened the top by 6 cm. It’s drafted ridiculously long. The length is now about where I like it, although the white is too thin to be worn out. But now I know.

I disregarded Burdas instructions on the length for the neck band and cut it 3 cm shorter than the neck opening. Ruth from CoreCouture recommends 5 cm but I was not that brave. I could probably have gone for 4 cm.

Verdict: Hmm. Its wearable, just. I still don’t like this top pattern any more with the second making than I did first time ’round. My shoulders don’t need this much emphasis. Time to put this pattern aside.

The skirt pattern, however, is a keeper. I like everything about it.

Fingers crossed that it’s good in something other than crazy Ikea fabric.

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20 Responses to Psychedelic ‘zebra’ skirt and friends

  1. prttynpnk says:

    Convince me? I want one!!!!

  2. Anne W says:

    Love the skirt! I would wear it with a plain colour top though! That tee pattern is a pain, too long in the length & the neck band is all wrong. Maybe it will look better worn with jeans? But your skirt rocks! 🙂

  3. Elle C says:

    Love the skirt, love the fabric, if only I was close to an Ikea, I would go and get me some, If I did manage to get a hold of some, I would make a skirt similar to yours. Love it.

  4. Sewbussted says:

    There are a lot of zebras wishing they could break away from the crowd by adding some colorful stripes to their coat. Jungle January worthy in my book!

  5. Clio says:

    LOVE LOVE LOVE the skirt! It’s perfect, even without pattern matching. The top is cute too and I like the stripes. But I can’t help thinking it would be a better pattern if where the sleeve and bodice met the seam was angled a little more vertical. It seems a little too horizontal-ish if that makes sense, and that makes the torso look more square. Perhaps that’s what you are reacting to as well?

    • SewingElle says:

      Yes. Thats the conclusion I came to too. The almost raglan sleeve is not angled enough to be flattering on me. And the neck line is too wide but not enough scooped.
      It’s just all wrong for me.
      But plenty of others have made this top and its looked great. I have too little waist definition and shoulders that are too broad. Rectangles be wary of this one!

  6. Paola says:

    Fabulous skirt. A skirt like this is what I love about sewing, because where could you buy a skirt like that? Nowhere, that’s where.
    I’ve had that top in the mental sewing queue, but your comments about it emphasising broad shoulders has got me questioning it.
    And your shoes look great with this outfit.

  7. Tia Dia says:

    OK – dissension, here! I love your shirt, and don’t see the problem with the red stripes, even if they are horizontal-ish. It’s a great tee and a nice variation on the nautical theme (well, in my mind red/white or blue/white or a combo of the three always screams boats for some reason) that will be great through summer, imho. I’ve only made one to date, and agree with Ruth’s calculations re: the neckline binding. And broad shoulders are always nice to emphasize, I think, because they make hips look slim! 🙂 And although I’m not crazy about pairing it with your psychedelic zebra print, it does smack of runway pattern (non) matching, so what’s not to love? I’ve often wondered about that skirt pattern, BTW, and love how it fits. I wasn’t too sure about the pockets – thought they’d add some width through the high hip – but it’s a super nice silhouette. I’m adding it to my some-day queue!

  8. SewingElle says:

    I usually don’t have a problem with emphasizing my broad shoulders, but this top is too line backer even for me. Its the not-quite-raglan sleeve seam, not just the stripe contrast with the plain, because the solid red version I made first had the same problem. Both tops look great with a cardigan 🙂
    It would look so different on you, because you have a gorgeous slim waist. I’ve decided this sleeve style in not for those with little waist definition.
    Runway pattern matching? I like that description!

  9. CherryPix says:

    IKEA fabrics are brilliant for skirts! And I don’t think matching stripes would work as well …too matchy! Agree that the t shoulder seams would be better if more diagonal..but I like the striped fabric contrasting with main fabric!

  10. amalitar says:

    Fantastic skirt! I didnt realize it has pockets. Pretty and practical, must keep it in mind. I love how you made that diffucult print work. I like the non-matching seams better than if they did match. A crazy print like that shouldn’t play by the rules. But it is funny how the back mismatch is inddeed better than the sides, i guess our eyes still crave some uniformity. As fort he top, I’m afraid i don’t have anything useful to add. I too made a raglan tee lately that doesn’t quite look right on me. I’ll revisit it to see if my problem is similar to yours.

  11. Ingrid says:

    What I want to know is why is she sniffing the parsley?
    Love the skirt, it’s so distinctive. I must check out Ikeas’s fabrics again (sans impatient 10 year old boy this time).

    • SewingElle says:

      I want to know that too. I suspect it’s a ruse to keep on checking out that chef .
      Impatient children. Yes they are the worst at Ikea’s fabric section.Good thing that school is back this week!

  12. sewruth says:

    Happy skirt! It makes me smile. I bet you’re smiling when you wear it too.

  13. Pingback: “Me Tarzan, you very on Trend! “ | Pretty Grievances

  14. Pingback: The skirt edition of sewing at the beach | He Cooks… She Sews!

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