Oscar de la Renta coat

Thank you for your lovely comments on my last post about this coat. I’m delighted with it!

One side view..

and the other.

Now, the promised construction details.

A major decision with this project was which side of the fabric to use. My initial thought was ‘how convenient that lamination is, because I won’t need to interface’.

Then I looked more closely. It was sort of weirdly beautifully. Shiny, and crinkled in a way that mirrored the boucle underneath. And a glorious deep chocolate colour.

Liz had told me it was an Oscar de la Renta runway fabric, and the Mood fabrics printout with the fabric said that too. A happy hour or so on Style.com located the runway photos. Oscar had used the laminated side on the outside. That decided it!

It also looked like he might have used lapped seams. I liked that idea too.

I decided which seams were going to be lapped and then trimmed the seam allowance of the side that would end up on top. Sticky tape was my friend for marking the seam allowance on the piece that was going to end up underneath

I pinned the top piece flush against my sticky tape line…

and stitched away.

Sticky tape was even useful as a guide for the vent overlap stitching line

I’m pleased with how the lapped seams turned out. They emphasize the seams lines, and add a slight edgy moto jacket vibe to the coat.

I didn’t lap all the seams. The waist and the side seams were stitched conventionally and then the seam allowance secured on the inside with another line of stitching

The extra lines of stitching on the outside are a nice feature

I love the tweedy inside.

Here it is inside out. As you can see, I sewed the collar onto the neck wrong sides together, i.e. opposite to the other seams, because the inside shows with the collar and lapels folded out when its worn.

I wondered if I might need to purchase a walking foot or a Teflon foot for this project, but the normal foot seemed to deal with the laminated side just fine.

And , on a fabric note, I noticed while window shopping on the Mood website for other Oscar de la Renta fabrics (and why wouldn’t I? This experience was so lovely) that this fabric is available again. Not affiliated, just a happy sewist.

Back to construction stuff.

Burda has the buttons a smidge higher than the waist seam, but I ignored this style direction.

I placed mine on the waist because then I could make easy peasy inseam button holes.

I love these buttons

I added a snap closure to hold the collar in place…

I don’t like it so much with the collar opening up to the waist.

I’m delighted to have this coat in the wardrobe, snuggling up here with my husband’s coats.

This was fun project. This very special fabric meant there was no hair canvas, interfacing, facing or linings, and no hems or special seam finishes. A truly anti-tailored coat.

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34 Responses to Oscar de la Renta coat

  1. Miss Celie says:

    I can’t even. For real. This coat is so so beautiful!!!

  2. Summerflies says:

    What great construction techniques – I love the tip with the sticky tape, I’ll remember that for sure. It’s such a great coat – anti-tailored indeed 🙂

  3. accordion3 says:

    A really lovely coat! You must be so pleased.

  4. Tia Dia says:

    Gorgeous. Just gorgeous. I’m curious about the laminated side. Does it feel plasticky or more shiny satiny? Thanks for sharing all the construction nitty gritty. And I agree with you on the buttons – they’re perfect.

    • SewingElle says:

      It’s hard to describe. It’s not stiff but not shiny satin either. Soft with some structure? It is a very thin layer and the structure comes from the boucle. It’s nice to touch. Less plasticky than pleather but not just like the real thing either.
      I have a small piece left that I’m contemplating using for a skirt, with the laminated side next to my skin. It will be super warm but not unpleasantly synthetic feeling, I am guessing.

  5. Nonsuch says:

    A masterpiece. The seam details are gorgeous. Having seen it IRL and felt the fabric, I was surprised at how soft and non-plasticky it was.

  6. So very stylish – this coat is a head-turner! Your sewing details add such subtle, but important emphasis in just the right places. What a great coat!

  7. AllisonC says:

    It is fabulous! Sometimes it is tricky to know what to do to really show off these designer fabrics so I think you were smart to look at, and take inspiration, from the original designer pieces. Love the tape tip too.

  8. Thanks for sharing all the construction details of your fabulous coat. I must say, I am surprised at how little “tailoring” was involved. Great work.

  9. Fabulous! Great use of the amazing fabric. Very posh looking 🙂

  10. macinic says:

    This is so perfect!! An excellent showcase of such a fabulous fabric – magnificent!!

  11. Paola says:

    A showstopper!

  12. sewruth says:

    Stunning and not just the fabric. A very good choice of pattern that works with the fabric and suits you too. I wish you cold weather.

  13. Pingback: Hot rocks dragon skin dress: Burdastyle 12/2014 #112 | He Cooks… She Sews!

  14. thornberry says:

    Oh my! How could I have possible missed commenting on this coat earlier? It is absolutely the epitome of fabulous! Such beautiful work, I bet that you are absolutely thrilled with yourself. Just wonderful.

  15. Gail says:

    I think you’ve created an heirloom! Well done, a truly beautiful coat.

  16. Pingback: Fabulous Fabric Comes with High Expectations! | corecouture

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