The skirt edition of sewing at the beach

I made some skirts at the beach too. Simple stretch cotton summer staples. Fabric from the stash, but originally from Gay Naffine’s sales in July 2014 and November 2010.

Red ticking skirt

This is an adaptation of my asymmetrical wrap skirt Burdastyle 12/2013 #109

I took the left front side pattern piece (the one with the straight hem) and cut it out on the fold on the centre front line. I added a centre back seam to the back, plus a zip and walking slit. And used a facing instead of the waistband. In other words, it bears little resemblance to the original pattern!

A teensy bit of topstitching and, viola! a casual summer straight skirt.

The blouse is a me-made from October 2013: BurdaStyle 07-2011-121. It’s one of those blouses I reach for over and over again, and still looks great. I put that down to fabulous fabric. It really is worth sewing with the good stuff.

Lemon yellow skirt:

You saw this skirt in the last blog post. It’s BurdaStyle 01/2011 #137. It doesn’t seem to be available as a pdf download, but if you have this issue, have a look at this pattern. It’s a winner!

I first made it for Jungle January 2014, and have been meaning to repeat for a long time. This one is just the same as the Crazy Zebra version, except without lining.

It’s a nice pegged retro-ish over the knee length style, with a reasonably long walking vent that makes it easy to wear.

I’ve paired it here with another simple  knit top, BurdaStyle 04/2014 #109

I did a lazy persons petite adjustment (raised the neckline 2 cm) but otherwise changed nothing. Two pattern pieces? What was there to really change!?

This pattern is a bit of a sleeper. Burda made it up in a chunky knit, and instructed picking up stitches at the hem with a knitting needle and casting off using yarn you’d unravelled from the remnants of fabric. Sort of pretend knitting.

The pattern easily adapts to a regular knit. Instead of bias binding for the neckline, I cut out a skinny facing and, after stitching it to the bodice and flipping to the inside, stitched it down with a twin needle. I shamelessly copied this idea from Mary Athey.

This was cut out as a 42 grading to a 44 at the hips. It’s very roomy.

I know there are draglines from the bust but I’m not worrying about that (or ablogogising).

It’s a two piece pattern. I got to use up a knit remnant from fabric I loved and Felicity ‘stole’. So much to love. Draglines can be sorted with the next version. This one is going to be worn.

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15 Responses to The skirt edition of sewing at the beach

  1. Tia Dia says:

    What a great set of separates that work together so well. I have often eyed the Burda pattern for your lemony skirt, and think the bright sunny yellow is perfect.

  2. sewbussted says:

    While we are surrounded by mounds of snow, it’s such a delight to see bright summer colors. So pretty and so refreshing 🙂

  3. Nonsuch says:

    very impressive holiday work! the lemony skirt has lovely lines.

  4. Ah draglines, if I like a top I couldn’t care less about them and if it is a 2 piece pattern they are almost impossible to avoid, I love your clothes! I’m at the beach too, it’s just wonderful to be on holidays!

  5. Both are lovely outfits. Your beach holiday has been quite productive.

  6. sewruth says:

    You must have packed your stash to take to the beach with you! Simple yet lovely skirts – summery colours. Really like the lemon one with pockets.

  7. Pingback: Crazy Cat Lady Coat: BurdaStyle 12/2011 #114 and some more European travel | He Cooks… She Sews!

  8. Karey says:

    Skirt 1/2011 #137 looks good in both the lemon and zebra version. I love how you use patterned fabric.
    I hadn’t realised it had pockets. I’m always trying to add them to patterns. Was just about to trawl through my Burda stash to look for a pocket to use as a starting point with panel skirt 8/2016 #129 (http://www.burdastyle.com/pattern_store/patterns/pencil-skirt-082016). This will do fine 🙂

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