Seventies coat: BurdaStyle 02/2010 #126

I’ve never liked seventies fashion. I blame it on seventies hand-me-downs from my older cousins that didn’t fit me until the eighties. By which time they were just so uncool.

Felicity, however, has no such bad associations.

We came across a coated denim in the newest store of The Fabric Store in Adelaide. It’s coated in a velvety forest green faux suede sort of layer. Almost upholstery like. Reduced to $12 per metre because it was a bit marked from transport. As you can see above. I just saw a lovely distressed look that would make a great casual coat. So did Felicity!

I used a simple classic coat pattern: BurdaStyle 02/2010 #126. And made it unlined, with flap patch pockets instead of welt pockets, the buttons spread out a lot more and swapped the contrast to the collar instead of the lapels. You know, almost exactly the same.

126_jacket_large

I normally do an FBA for Felicity but I did a lazy grading instead: a size 40 at the shoulders then out to a 42 elsewhere. It’s not perfect (those drag lines!) and the stiff of the fabric meant easing the sleeve cap in was a challenge (those puckers!), but it’ll do.

I used another The Fabric Store purchase (a mid to heavy weight denim) for the collar and pocket flaps. It’s really a lot darker in colour than these photos would lead you to believe.

It has a bit of stretch so I interfaced these pieces. I didn’t interface anything else –  my coated denim already had lots of structure.

And this coat was completed with vintage buttons might even have come from a coat from the seventies – they were part of a sewing notions collection gifted to me from an elderly sewing friend.

Pretty happy with how this turned out. And so is Felicity. I’m still not attracted to seventies styles for me though…

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19 Responses to Seventies coat: BurdaStyle 02/2010 #126

  1. Christine says:

    Love it, especially your top stitching, so close to the edge. Looking forward to visiting The Fabric Store.

  2. amalitar says:

    What an awesome coat! Good choice on changing the contrast bits. The pocket flaps stand out more and the collar will handle the wear better in the dark denim. And I especially like the “distressed” stripes on the fabric. Without them it might have looked too “precious”, trying to be real velvet. Instead it is totally insouciant and perfect for a young woman. Lucky Felicity!!

    • SewingElle says:

      Thanks. We did well with this one.
      And I’ve tested a swatch: it can be washed without shrinkage and it will acquire a crushed velvet look to add to the stripes.

  3. accordion3 says:

    Oh the memories…. My mother saved all my sister’s clothing for me. It was a hand-me-down to her and she was 13 year older than me. A lot of it was in that truly hideous nylon, or super stiff and smelly cotton. I am certain this was the primary catalyst for me to make my own clothes.

    I do like the jacket. I think the fact that your daughter is smiling helps. I don’t think it was possible for me to smile in my sister’s old clothes. Plus this is a cool jacket of which I am little envious.

  4. sewbussted says:

    Love the little touch of the denim on the collar and pockets. Fun coat!

  5. susew says:

    The contrast collar and pocket flaps is a great detail. Does she realize how lucky she is?

  6. Nonsuch says:

    This great. The fabric is special and the whole coat is everything good about the 70s rolled into one garment. I am also scarred from hand-me-downs from the 70s, but distressed velvet is probably enough to get me to revisit….

  7. What a great pairing of pattern and fabric. 70s in the best possible way.

  8. ruthchalk says:

    I love the way you have used what might have been a ‘reject’ piece of fabric and made a feature of its qualities. Great bit of reclaiming!

  9. Pingback: Dressing like a librarian: BurdaStyle 08/2018 #109 | He Cooks… She Sews!

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