Dressing like a librarian: BurdaStyle 08/2018 #109

Felicity’s love of 70’s style continues.  She requested this ‘waistcoat bodice dress’ for her Mothers’ Day outfit*

770x967_bs_2018_08_109_heft_large

We went fabric shopping at Spotlight. I was uninspired by their offerings for the waistcoat bodice dress but we did come home with a lovely dark floral rayon that was destined to be a tie neck blouse.

And become one using this very appropriately name ‘Seventies style blouse’ Burdastyle 01/2016 #114

114b-012016-b_large

… modified to include the neck tie of the dress version:

I don’t yet have a good photo of the blouse because it didn’t make the Mothers’ Day outfit cut. I’m confident Felicity loves it, though, because it has been worn already several times. Here it is in a poorly lit and blurry photo and with her green velvet 70s coat and cross body bag covering most of it up, but still looking fabulous! Even if I do say so myself.

The next step was to make the pinafore dress. A lovely deep green crepe was ordered from EOS. Deemed unsuitable by Felicity (secretly very happy because now I get to use it for me!).

Plan B. We went to The Fabric Store in search of a suitable fabric. (Yes we now have The Fabric Store in Adelaide. So happy about that!)

And we found a beautiful cotton boucle with sparkle. We are both in love with this fabric.

Lets talk about the waistcoat bodice dress pattern. This is BurdaStyle 08/2018 #109.

770x967_bs_2018_08_109_heft_large

I did a bit of pattern manipulation to a straight sized 40 to make it work for a D Cup, and this added a bit to the depth and alignment of the buttons above the waistband.

It was supposed to have the buttons in a vertical line, but I didn’t get the redrafting perfect and bringing the overlap over further gave a better line through the bust, so that’s what we went with.

I lined both the bodice and the skirt, and used lining  on the inside of the waistband and under the flaps to reduce bulk.

I was seduced by sparkly silver bias binding I had in my stash and used that for the hem.

I like how it looks, but it is a bit stiff and really not at all in keeping with the style or the fancy fabric. Will I go back and change it? Hmm. So many other more interesting sewing tasks to do…

Dressing like a librarian. She could not resist with a sign like this!

*Our church group schedules an event (“special meetings”) on the second Sunday in May every year. Yes that’s Mother’s Day in Australia. And yes, a new outfit is traditional.

Here’s three of them…

My dress is a modified sheath dress from Burda (it’s become my TNT) made from a polyester jacquard purchased from The Fabric Store. Our dear friend M of Nonsuch Sewing is in Victory Patterns Hazel made up in a silk twill.

I’ll finish up with this delightful photo of my ‘adult’ children. If you take a zillion photos on your mum’s phone you’ve got to expect at least one of them to turn up on the blog!

Love these crazy kids!

Seventies coat: BurdaStyle 02/2010 #126

I’ve never liked seventies fashion. I blame it on seventies hand-me-downs from my older cousins that didn’t fit me until the eighties. By which time they were just so uncool.

Felicity, however, has no such bad associations.

We came across a coated denim in the newest store of The Fabric Store in Adelaide. It’s coated in a velvety forest green faux suede sort of layer. Almost upholstery like. Reduced to $12 per metre because it was a bit marked from transport. As you can see above. I just saw a lovely distressed look that would make a great casual coat. So did Felicity!

I used a simple classic coat pattern: BurdaStyle 02/2010 #126. And made it unlined, with flap patch pockets instead of welt pockets, the buttons spread out a lot more and swapped the contrast to the collar instead of the lapels. You know, almost exactly the same.

126_jacket_large

I normally do an FBA for Felicity but I did a lazy grading instead: a size 40 at the shoulders then out to a 42 elsewhere. It’s not perfect (those drag lines!) and the stiff of the fabric meant easing the sleeve cap in was a challenge (those puckers!), but it’ll do.

I used another The Fabric Store purchase (a mid to heavy weight denim) for the collar and pocket flaps. It’s really a lot darker in colour than these photos would lead you to believe.

It has a bit of stretch so I interfaced these pieces. I didn’t interface anything else –  my coated denim already had lots of structure.

And this coat was completed with vintage buttons might even have come from a coat from the seventies – they were part of a sewing notions collection gifted to me from an elderly sewing friend.

Pretty happy with how this turned out. And so is Felicity. I’m still not attracted to seventies styles for me though…

Unlined linen jacket: Burda 02/2009 #115

This jacket was inspired by @groovygreylook. Meridy posted a purple linen version to her Instagram and I remembered how much I liked this Burda magazine pattern.

That was all I needed to search through the archives, trace it off and cut out my fabric.

This is style 115 from the 02/2009 issue. Almost vintage!

Жакет

I made this I in a size 44 and I think the fit is just fine.

(early morning photography = odd light )

Of course getting fit right in a boxy style is really only about the shoulders. The dart could be a touch too low and no doubt there are other things that you can see if you look at it very critically. But it’s an unlined and not very structured crumpled linen jacket. The fit is fine!

I used a coated linen that was a souvenir from Barcelona. And because this was such a fabulous fabric I took a little bit extra care.

Hong Kong seam treatments on the sleeves, shoulders and facings.

That’s fusible interfacing on the bias edges of the raglan sleeve seams. I used quite a bit of interfacing in this project, even in the hem (hoping this will stop it rolling up after sitting. So far it’s working!)

Flat felled seams through the main body of the jacket and top stitching.

Precision sewing. This is the shoulder. Ask me about unpicking and lots of pins.

Lots of top stitching. Did I say that already? And extra nice buttons

I particularly like these pockets. They were fun to construct and they are delightfully capacious.

I’m very pleased with this jacket. It’s the perfect smart casual jacket for cooler summer evenings.

I need to reacquaint myself with the rest of my old Burda magazines. Who knows what other treasures lie therein?

Happy pants: BurdaStyle 01/2017 #110

These are Burdastyle 01/2017 #110 in a woven Indian cotton from my local Spotlight fabrics store and made without the hem bands – I just added length to the legs.

110b-012017-b_large

I made these in a size 42 and they are too big for Felicity through the bum and thigh. But. Happy pants. Is fit something that should even be in the same sentence??

To be frank the poor fit does irritate me, but she’s happy to wear them so I’ve decided I’ll just do a better job next time and not stress about these ones.

This pattern has a nice design of a flat centred waist insert and then the rest of the waist is elasticised.

I didn’t have elastic in the right width so I improvised with two lots of wider elastic rather than three and then stitched through the middle. This gives the appearance of four channels of elastic and prevents rolling (at least it does for the elastic I had in stash. Better elastic to start with might not need this)

Bottom line (see what I did there?!) is that this is a good pattern, the fabric is lovely to wear, and a very cute outfit can be made by putting these trousers with a top Felicity scored from M of Nonsuch sewing.

Happy days!

Maxi dress: BurdaStyle 04/2013 #125

Another addition to Felicity’s black and ivory summer mini wardrobe: a maxi dress based on BurdaStyle 04/2013 #125

125_0413_b_large

It’s sewn in rayon from Spotlight. Unfortunately I didn’t buy a generous amount: I had 2.9 metres and the pattern called for 3.6 metres. This meant the bodice wasn’t lined and there was no belt, no button loops down the front and no gathered trim around the neck and armscyes.

It’s cut out as a size 42 with a 2cm FBA and the front neckline raised by 2 cm. I didn’t add in the vertical dart from the FBA. Instead I angled the side seams in a bit to compensate.

I stabilised the neck with cotton tape.

Then I finished the neckline and armscyes with bias binding from deep stash. The bias binding is stiff and I think it is cotton. It’s also not prewashed. Could be a recipe for disaster…

Both the front and the back bodice have a central seam so getting a nice neat V in the middle is easy: you just sew it in after you’ve finished and faced everything.

The shirring was done with what I think is hat elastic (also deep stash), or could just be elastic thread, in the bobbin. This is a trick my mum taught me. I thought it broke all sorts of sewing rules until I googled and found several tutorials describing the exact same thing. So its a totally legit method.Much more fun when I thought mum had shown me something clever but a bit dodgy!

It’s a bit weird to have elastic in your bobbin. But it really works!

The front and back bodices were shirred individually after the centre back and centre front seams were sewn. This meant the shirring went across the centre back and centre front seams

I tied off the ends and then sewed over them before joining the side seams together. Hope it all holds together.

The skirt is gathered and then sewn into the shirred bodice. You have to stretch the shirring out. If I make this again I’ll do the shirring after attaching the skirt.

I know the pattern placement is not ideal or evenly spaced through the shirring. But not having enough fabric will do that to you.

Pockets were added because pockets are always a good idea. Even when you have no fabric for them. I always seem to find something suitable in my remnants stash for pockets! This time it seems to be a very thin black silk. I can’t even remember what I made from it. Clearly this is also deep stash.

Back view without hair so we can see the V back.

After these photos were taken the hem went up by 5 cm to make it less like a gown.

Lovely pattern. Lovely daughter!

Christmas/New Year sewing

I love the easy days between Christmas and New Year’s Day. Perfect for sewing! And this year my dear friend M joined me.

What’s better than a sewing day on Boxing Day? A sewing day on Boxing Day with a sewing friend! The catering by He who Cooks was pretty good too.

This Christmas/New Year sewing was all about Felicity. I’m working on a mini wardrobe in black and ivory and the first two garments were shorts and a shirt.

Sailor shorts

These are Burdastyle 06/2014 #122 in a size 40 and made up in a stretch cotton with about 25% stretch lengthwise and at right angles to the stripes. I cut them out so that the stretch went around the body. They are stretchy enough that a double needle hem was the best choice. So a knit in the form of a woven. What’s not to love?

I faced the waistband and upper fronts with a black poly cotton from the stash, and interfaced the poly cotton to give it some body.

I also made the conscious decision to not change my overlocker thread from white. Yes really. It matches the pinstripes. Ahem.

My reasoning for different facing fabric was that the stripes are ridged and might be uncomfortable against the skin. Also, all that stretch needed to be brought under some control.

I cut the waistband on the non stretchy direction to help with this too. Also I like the change in stripe direction!

Aren’t those buttons darling? They were from the stash, I had exactly the number I needed and they seemed the perfect buttons for sailor front shorts. It was meant to be.

I didn’t read the instructions well enough so the underlayer at the front was cut the same length as the upper layer. This was a bit of an issue at the bottom of the zip (there’s a zip under the button front) but I managed to get both the upper and under layer back together with some snipping.

This mistake did have the advantage of making pseudo pockets – I caught the underlayer into the hem and this meant everything was enclosed apart from the buttoned top and a tiny bit through the inner thigh. I think they’ll function as pockets ok. So all’s well that ends well.

Kalle shirt

I love Closet Case Patterns Kalle shirt pattern. And I love the Liberty lawn fabric I used for this version, even if it does have the odd name of Kevin.

It’s based on the celestial ceiling art in the hallway of a grand house in Scotland. The fabric has been in the stash for a year or two.

Gemini! Felicity’s star sign.

This Kalle shirt was made the same as all the other ones: I lengthened the crop top version by 10 cm but retained the faced hem.

The buttons for this one came from the stash too. I’m pretty certain their first life was on one of He who Cooks’s shirts.

I have enough shirt buttons in the stash to last more than a lifetime, yet I still cut them off worn out shirts. Someone will inherit a healthy button stash! I did and I love having buttons that I played with as a kid from my mum’s and nana’s button jar.

And what do these garments look like on Felicity?

Very cute.

Pseudo pockets in action.

Stealth sailor version (untucked)

Happy New Year!

Trying to perfect a pattern

I’ve now made six dresses based on BurdaStyle 02/2014 #141. Six. Just this year. Yes, that surprised me too!

Version 5 was made in a novelty weave fabric in deep stash and originally from Gorgeous Fabrics labelled Maggy London.

The fabric lacks body and collapsed a bit under my bust so I added some vertical darts.

The sleeves are too tight in this version and I’ll probably remove them and make it sleeveless. But I haven’t got around to it yet. I think it may be more dinner date without the sleeves. With the sleeves it seems more lady who lunches or fancy office wear.

Version 6 is a lovely linen shift.

I love this dress. I purchased the fabric in a soft finishing shop in Wellington, New Zealand and would like to have a sofa covered in it too as well as curtains and dining chairs. Yes I really do love it!

It’s a heavy weight linen and the perfectly on grain print and centred symmetrical pattern make pattern matching and invisible zip insertion a dream. I should make more garments from soft furnishing fabric.

I lined this dress in white cotton batiste. It’s a delight to wear on a hot summers day.

I’ve surprised myself looking back at how many times I’ve repeated other patterns as well this year. Is this a sign I’m maturing as a sewist or just a lack of imagination?!

White Christmas dress

I’ve been dreaming of a White Christmas…dress. Apologies to Bing Crosby and Michael Bublé.

And my dreams have materialized thanks to my fabric and pattern stash. Gotta love an extensive stash!

This pattern  is from one of Burda’s extra magazines. The website is calling it Burda Easy HW/2014 but my magazine is called Burda Special Autumn/Winter 2014. It’s Dress E without the collar and pocket flaps. Also available as a PDF download

4e_image_easy_large

I made this dress in 2015 in a colour-blocked white and grey patterned lace and grizzled about a sway back issue that I didn’t manage to fix. Then, after a short period in the magic closet, I wore the dress all the time.

Three years on, it was time to make an all white version. I traced off the size up (thanks peri-menopause!) and made a trial version in a Christmas themed cotton print. With sleeves, out of curiosity.  This dress  was the supporting act in my last post.

The fit seemed okay, so I went ahead with my ivory stretch cotton jacquard.

I love this fabric. I already have a skirt made in it that I love.

I used a poly cotton for the facings.

There’s a side zip.

I used a bias cut poly cotton remnant to cover the end of the zip too.

I added a pocket, on the non zip side. Because. Pockets!

The sway back issue is still there.

I’m thinking now that it might be a short torso issue.

But, you know what? I can’t see it from the front. I predict I’m going to wear this dress. A. Lot.

Out take. White Christmas Monster.

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to everyone who celebrates.

When Fiona met Christmas prints: Closet Case Patterns Fiona sundress

A Christmas sundress for an Aussie Christmas. How could this not be an excellent idea?

This is Closet Case Patterns Fiona sundress in a Chris quilting cotton from Spotlight.

I made it in a size 14 with a FBA and some other bodice side seam tweaks to get the fit right. I used a reasonably heavy weight interfacing and this means the top interfaced bodice band is very firm. Definitely no gaping!

The bodice is a bit overfitted by the look of those draglines. But look at her smile. I figure it’ll do.

Pockets! Side slits! Topstitching opportunities! I love this pattern. Also buttons! 17 on Felicity’s sun dress. The instructions call for even more.

I made the buttonholes horizontal to make them a bit more secure and to reduce gaping.

oh yes. I made a Christmas print frock too.

I wanted to trial a dress from the Autumn/Winter 2014 version of Easy Burda. And why use boring calico when I had more Christmas print cotton in the stash?

Kitsch yes. Fun also yes.

What not to do with scuba: BurdaStyle 05/2011 #108B

Felicity was gifted some floral scuba and she has a church event coming up that needs a nice frock.

Both she and I have wanted to make BurdaStyle 05/2011 #108B for a long time.

108b_0511_b_original_large

Fabric and an event and a pattern.  Seemed like an excellent coalescing of opportunities and needs.

Or was it?

I traced off a 21 and made a 2.5 cm FBA. The flat pattern measuring and the tissue fitting with the (non stretchy) pattern pieces was a perfect fit in length and width. The scuba bodice was also excellent, on its own, before that heavy skirt was attached.

I forgot that 4 way stretch in fabric with weight and a long full skirt should not be in the same garment. The stretch needed to be corralled into submission with interfacing and interlining and inter everything. I did none of this.

I unpicked, removed length and width and re-attached the bodice and the skirt three times.

Something still had to be done to rescue it.

I made a sash. Out of three small remnants.

It brings that waist back in and covers the evidence that the seaming was still a bit too low.

Now wearable. Phew.

Would have been such a shame to waste this pretty fabric.

Green lantern dress: based on BurdaStyle 07/2016 #117

Several African wax prints were selected by Felicity when we had mother & daughter time in Paris two years ago. This fabulous green lantern one has been patiently waiting to be turned into a dress since then.

Felicity and I have had various ideas about what to do with it, but nothing had seemed right until she suggested using the same pattern as my ghost fish dress.

011517_1053_GhostFishdr1.jpg

This dress is based on  Burdastyle 07/2016 #117– made symmetric and without the straps.

011517_1053_GhostFishdr2.jpg

Mine was a sort of size 42. I got her to try it on to see how far it was from her size.

Of course it was too big for Felicity though the waist and hips. But the fit through the bust wasn’t too bad.

So. I could trace off a new copy of this pattern in her size and then do an FBA, or I could use the pattern I already had and just take it in from the bust down. A cheaters FBA.

You know what I did.

We both love the dress. This story ended well!

Dress code ‘smart casual – frolicking in the fields’. Or what I sewed for my brother’s wedding

What do you do when you receive a wedding invitation with a dress code like this?

You buy new fabric and make two new dresses. Of course! What other option was there?

I had ‘nothing’ already suitable in my wardrobe or fabric stash. And it was a spring wedding in Queensland so I couldn’t be sure of the weather on the day. I needed at least two options….

This is the one I wore. Aren’t the textiles in the hotel lobby excellent?

This dress is a repeat of what seems to be becoming my TNT sheath dress, based on BurdaStyle 02/2014#141. Made up in scuba. Previous versions blogged already and I’m sure I’ll be making more. There are some further fit adjustments needed.

With this one, the bust apex was too low so I did a lazy short bodice adjustment: I took 2 cm out of the shoulder seam and then adjusted the sleeve by taking the same 2 cm out of the sleeve seam. I know. Not the right way to do it. But. Scuba. #forgiving

If you look hard you can see that the bust dart is still a bit low. You can also see the awesome sleeve head dart that this design has.

I really like this print.

I even like the chopped up pattern through the back!

I added a zip, but it is not needed because my scuba has enough stretch.

And this is the dress I didn’t wear.

This is Burdastyle 05/2010 #139 in a border print viscose. The border print is subtle –  a great big white triangle with climbing flowers reaching more than halfway through the width.

I’ve loved this pattern for a long time.

Kimono Dress 5/2010

Gotta love Burda’s photo shoots.

Who wouldn’t want to be wearing a dress like this while hanging out your washing, in heels, in a gorgeous light filled historic Rome apartment with your hot Italian man lying on the bed with his shirt off? Presumably because he only has one set of clothes and they are in the wash? Come to think of it, even better would be to be the one on the bed doing nothing while your hot Italian man hangs out the washing in his underclothes. Sigh. One can dream. About living in Italy.

Back to the sewing.

The design is supposed to be lined but my viscose didn’t need it.

139_052010_large

This meant I finished the neck differently.

First I stabilised the neck edge with cotton tape on the right side to try to keep the bias under control (and woven viscose has got to be the worst fabric to try and sew on the bias!)

Then I sewed on bias tape right side to wrong side, trimmed and flipped to the front and then topstitched it down. Viola. Facing and trim all done.

This is what it looked like on the wrong side before I trimmed off the extra and sewed the bodice edge to the skirt. No lining, but a clean finish and the bias edge supported.

Everything else was standard, apart from length – my dress is 10 cm longer than drafted. I wanted to get all of that border printed triangle of white on the skirt!

I like this design, but I’m not convinced the pink bias trim and ribbon is the best addition.

Black or another darker colour would have been better. But, refer to wedding invitation instructions above. Spring hues it was.

Spring. Such a lovely time of the year. This is the view looking up through the blossoming Manchurian pear tree in my front garden last weekend. #nofilter. The sky really was that blue. Of course two days later it was cold again…

Pencil skirts and turtle necks

No, I have not yet made an A-line skirt.  But I have made five pencil skirts and two turtlenecks. Why isn’t there a sewing related version of the Twelve Days of Christmas? Ahem, I digress.

Five pencil skirts. Why? Well.  All of the skirts in my wardrobe made from my go to TNT pencil skirt pattern had ‘shrunk’. Not sure why…..I’m sure it’s nothing to do with my chocolate habit.

I turned to a new pegged pencil skirt pattern, BurdaStyle 10/2012 #145 and traced off a size up (a 46).

Five skirts later and I have a new TNT pattern.

My first version was a wearable muslin – a stretch woven with an elasticised waist, no walking vent and no zip. Baby steps. The fit was a bit on the big size.

Still, I’ve worn this skirt quite a bit. It’s a good cool weather casual skirt. Yes it creases. Yes that is a Monroe turtleneck. More on that later.

Encouraged by this I made a second version in a grey pinstripe woven with no stretch. Lovely fit through the hips but the waist was a bit on the big size. Perhaps I’m not a 46? Perhaps I should have added the waistband this style is drafted with?  Despite the looseness, I have worn this a lot this winter. It’s fabulous for work in my corporate environment.

I then jumped to a yellow double knit jersey with an elasticised waist. Because I wanted a yellow skirt and I had this fabric in the stash. Yellow brightens up my work day!

I made a mistake with the cutting out though and forgot to extend up the waist to incorporate the elastic. No problem I thought. I’ll just cut out a separate waistband/ facing.

See that annoying bubble? That’s what happens when you attach a facing waistband with over-locking and then add elastic.

Another ‘innovation’ for this skirt was to line it with tricot. Lovely to wear.

I still haven’t hemmed the lining. Bad sewist.

Version four was made in souvenir fabric. A Japanese linen cotton woven from Raystitch in London last year.

By this stage I’d nailed the fit.

This skirt is lined and has a grosgrain ribbon waistband/facing

The final version was in pleather. And I seem to have a lot of silly and overexposed photos of it

I added a centre front seam and a curved hem.

Not the best skirt to sit down in!

Everything got topstitched. I couldn’t iron it flat but I could sew it flat.

This skirt was lined too. Leopard print seemed the only suitable choice for faux ostrich.

I used an invisible zip. I suspect I’ll regret that soon when it breaks and I have to unpick it. I top stitched here too.

I faced the hem with premade wide bias binding. And top stitched that too. This project was top stitching heaven.

And the two turtlenecks? You’ve seen them already.

They were made with Tessuti’s free Monroe pattern.

I cut the neck band down to half the height. A swan like neck I do not have.

My stripy version was shortened by 5 cm but the ‘foxes in London’ print version was exactly as drafted.

The print on this fabric is almost too cute for words.

I’ve got to say, though, that the lack of accuracy slightly annoys me. A fox as big as a bus??! A row boat the size of three trees?!!

So that’s my story of basics. My wardrobe thanks me.

Secret pajamas maxi skirt: BurdaStyle 12/2015 #115

I’ve been trying some new silhouettes, styles, techniques and fabrics recently. Not all successfully.

I think this skirt might, just, however, sneak over the line into the success category. Although I am challenged with styling it.

Dowdy with my liberty shirt.

More successful as pseudo evening wear with a velvet top. Think how much better this would look if I’d stopped by the hair and makeup department before photography!

I know. It’s hardly revolutionary for a sewist to make a maxi skirt. But that’s not the point. It is for me. I haven’t made or worn a maxi skirt for years. It’s pencil skirts all the time for me.

This non pencil skirt is BurdaStyle 12/2015 #115B

https://burdastyle-assets.s3.amazonaws.com/patterns/technical_drawings/000/004/902/115-122015-M_large.jpg?1448854194

I went a bit off piste and used a double knit, swapped out the normal interfaced waistband for an elastic one and skipped the zip. That turned the skirt into secret pajamas.

The yoke is a nice feature.

I like the lines of the wrap front.

The back hangs nicely too (or would if I properly straightened it)

I also like the freedom of movement this style gives me! And it doesn’t seem to come at the expense of wardrobe malfunctions.

You really have to try hard and flip that top wrap layer up to show much leg.

This is a good pattern.

Who knows what will happen next? Perhaps… gasp…an A-line skirt instead of another pencil skirt?!

Or … I’ll use a Frixion pen for the first time?

I am so adventurous!

 

My jacket journey to Itch to Stitch’s Hvar

My wardrobe is lacking in me made work appropriate winter jackets.  Not really surprising. Jackets, done properly, can be a lot of work.

So, I purchased a lovely silvery grey ponte from Tessuti with a soft but semi-structured jacket in mind. And spent a delightful few days looking through my patterns and being distracted by all sorts of other projects before settling on BurdaStyle 08/2013 # 106.

106b_0813_b_button_jacket_large

I made a toile from leftover scuba to check the fit and to see how the style might look in a semi structured stretch fabric. Yes, I used two different remnants.

Gorgeous isn’t it!

And then I got cold feet. I decided that a woven stretch cashmere wool blend in my stash would be a much better match for this pattern. And also, a lot more work because proper tailoring would be required. So that project is still on the to-do list.

I still wanted to use the silvery ponte, so my next pattern choice was the Hvar Jacket by Itch to Stitch.

Itch to Stitch Hvar Jacket

This is a new to me pattern company.

I couldn’t possibly cut into that lovely silvery ponte without a toile! But I didn’t have enough of any other stable stretch fabric I was prepared to sacrifice for a toile.

So this time I committed to making a wearable muslin from a stretch synthetic suede that has been in my stash for almost as long as I’ve been a mum (Felicity has just turned 20…)

Yes, you know where this is going: silvery ponte still in the stash. I’m thinking it would make a great winter frock…

I’m very happy with my new suede blue jacket! It’s a nice mix between waterfall cardigan and formal jacket. With none of the work of tailoring or even lining.

This is a straight size 12 made up in a stretch synthetic suede. This fabric has about 10% stretch in one direction only.

I took the sleeve hems up a cm or two more than drafted but otherwise this is straight out of the packet, so to speak (it’s a PDF).

It’s not perfect but I’m happy enough with the fit. Good decision to make a wearable muslin. It’s very wearable!

And that blouse underneath the jacket?

I started making it last year and then got distracted.  It’s BurdaStyle 04/2010 #114 in Liberty’s strawberry thief tana lawn

114_shirt_large

I traced a size 44 and cut out as instructed except no pocket and no back loop. I’m happy with how it fits.

My efforts to pattern match paid off. There is something very satisfying about getting pattern matching right!

I didn’t use standard interfacing. Instead I used a cotton linen remnant as a sew in interfacing. I know no one can see it. But I loved this fabric and although the dress I made from it is long gone, it can live on with me in this shirt.

The ‘interfacing’ was fabric bought in the USA, the Liberty was purchased in the UK, the pattern is from Germany, I used Closet Case Files instructions from Canada for the collar points and the whole lot was sewn in Australia.

Multi-nationalism at its best!