Patrones: one out of three ain’t bad

Why Patrones? Good question. The answer is a lot to do with feeling dissatisfied with Burda itself and how I could subscribe in Australia. And liking the idea of an online magazine. And liking the concept of a smallish pdf that you then trace off your pattern from. Sounds odd?

This is what Doctor T said recently about Patrones : The downloadable PDFs are an interesting compromise; you have to both print and tile the PDF pages and trace them; but because each Patrones pattern only prints onto 9 pages it isn’t too bad to attach the PDF print-outs, and because each print-out only has 1 design, it isn’t that bad to trace either.

Seems like Patrones has it all. And you can subscribe issue by issue. So I did. For three issues.

Why have I stopped? Well you will need to read this post!

The first thing I made was this skirt. Which I totally adore.

Patrones 429 modelo 29 – Falda con pliegues (pleated skirt)

It has pockets. It has interesting drapes and folds. It has a shaped hem. It is inspired by a catwalk outfit. Of course this pattern spoke to me!

Worn here with a much loved Kalle shirt made in Liberty lawn

Wisely, I made a toile first. New pattern company and sizing, instructions in Spanish, no pictures of the pattern made up and worn by an actual person – too many unknowns!

Just as well I did because the pockets are a very different sort of construction and the goggle translation of the Spanish instructions were of very little help. It took a few adventures and quite a lot of unpicking before I worked it out.

The actual pocket is that little piece at the bottom. And no it is not attached to the facing of the drape. Ask my quick-unpick how I know. The larger piece is the yoke/side skirt
The drape is then attached to the yoke with a few stitches to hold the folds in place
Final step is to baste to the side seams
And here’s the flat lay. You can see some of my changes compared to the original draft. I curved the side seams back in by 4 cm to narrow the hem and create a balloon shape skirt and the back hem curves down rather than mirroring the front and curving up

How would have expected that the pockets and the turnback of the drape are not even connected?? Not me! I haven’t yet put something in the pockets and have it drop all the way through, but it will happen at some point!

The toile confirmed that size 48 worked for me but that I didn’t like the hem as drafted (shorter at CB and CF, longer at both sides and not pegged). So I changed that too and then made it up in a delightful midweight linen from Spotlight.

And have worn it at least once a week since.

My second attempt was not successful at all

Patrones 430 modelo 9 – Camisa Hawaiana Lloyds (Lloyds style Hawaiian shirt)

I drafted out from a size 46 (the largest size offered) to a 48 (which might be my size based on my success above). No toile this time – flat pattern measures through the bust suggested it would be fine.

Not making a toile was not a good idea – the sleeves bands on the extended shoulders were too tight, and the ease through the top was fine in terms of the fit, but not for style – this really needs to be looser to look good.

So Felicity has a new top! For the record – the sleeve bands are not loose enough on her either – pattern drafting fault I say!

I used a remnant of a lovely drapey viscose crepe – last used for a Tide dress.

But I didn’t have quite enough fabric so it got a contrast collar band in linen

Optimistic label use.

The third attempt was almost successful

Patrones 429 modelo 25 – Top cruzado (cross top)

The asymmetry drew me in.

No toile on this one (yes, I had learnt nothing..) but I did use fabric which had been languishing in my stash for a long time..

I love this cotton, polyester and metal blend fabric and I originally bought this ten years ago (yes! ten years!) in two colours – cream (this one) and light brown – like milky coffee. The coffee one got made into a skirt. But it always looks crinkled despite rigorous ironing because of the metallic content and yet its sort of fancy because of that metallic content so the creasing and the shimmer is a bit odd. I also remember that it was a bit itchy against my skin. So… almost toile fabric…

But, because it wasn’t really a toile, I used a soft linen cotton blend for the neck facing, so that the itch factor was dialed back. The linen cotton blend was harvested from a ripped pillow case – there’s a lot of back story to the fabrics in this blog post!

I traced off and made a size 48, and although it fitted okay, I thought it would be better with a bit more width through the body of the top to make it a bit boxier. So I added another strip of fabric to the side seams.

The insert is a strip the length of the top and 4 cm wide. I added 6 cm extra length at the top of the strip and tapered it to a point. This was inserted into the sleeve seam like a gusset. With all seams at 6 mm, this meant I added about 5 cm of extra width to the top below the armscyes.

And now I think its wearable.

I couldn’t work out from the line drawing or pattern or sewing instructions if the buttoned front was functional. It didn’t seem to be. The neck is crew neck style so no chance of putting this on without some sort of opening. So I added a slit and a button with a loop to the back.

The second label is “slow fashion” because this fabric spent a long time in my stash. I’m amusing myself with my labels.

Now I’ve gone back and paid more attention to the flat lay photo in the magazine it looks like there is an invisible zip at centre back. That would work too.

I could “french tuck” half of the front and make it even more asymmetric. But not the best look!

I love these buttons. They’ve been the stash a while too.

So back to the question of why I stopped my subscription

I don’t yet have the sizing sorted, but that’s not a major issue. I don’t mind the printing and tracing – 9 pages is easy. Some of the designs are delightful so its not because I don’t like enough of the styles.

I think its two things: the language barrier – I must enjoy reading about sewing more than I realised – and it being online – despite the convenience of being online, I’d much rather read from an actual magazine.

Any one else tried this new format of Patrones recently? What did you think?

The last of the summer sewing

The season has turned, I’ve brought my winter coats back into the wardrobe. It’s almost too late to be blogging about summer sewing… but not quite!

This top is Burdastyle 06/2016 #129

Crepe Tunic 129 | 06/16
https://www.burdastyle.com/crepe-tunic-129-06-16.html

I’ve even used a similar colour to Burda.

Crepe Tunic 129 | 06/16

Mine is made from a floaty cotton voile that has been in my stash almost forever (9 years – I’ve patted it appreciatively and admired its colour and hand many times since it came to live with me). This fabric is designer deadstock – from Gay Naffine/Lucy Giles.

I made several adjustments to the pattern to get the fit better.

I traced off a size 46, petite-ed the bodice by 2 cm above the bust dart and made a 2 cm forward shoulder – which meant I also brought the tucks in the sleeve head forward. Are you supposed to do that?

The adjustments certainly worked for the shoulder fit, but the bust darts ended up a touch high.

The neck depth is good but it is quite wide though – if there is a next time I’ll consider bringing it in a bit.

I didn’t include the front slit but I did keep the idea of regular tacks down the front band by adding pearl buttons (shining in the bad side light of the image above)

I used a very light interfacing for the neck band and the front bands as well as to reinforce those square seams

A KATM tag on the side seam above the slit because I can.

I promise this is the last ‘touching my hair’ photo!

The skirt is an old favourite made in my new larger size – 46 waist and 48 hips – Burdastyle 07/2012 #134

Yes this is from the Russian Burda Site. I have no knowledge of the Russian language, but the site is more useful than the US based one. https://burdastyle.ru/vikroyki/yubki/yubka-burda-2012-7-134/

I love the quirkiness of the darts at the hem. I didn’t sew the darts to the outside as per the pattern for this version. There was already enough going on with the stripes.

This is a stretch cotton that’s been in my stash for even longer – 11 years. Bought in 2010. That’s deep stash. This fabric is also designer deadstock- from Gay Naffine.

The second summer top is Friday Pattern Company’s square neck top.

https://fridaypatterncompany.com/products/square-neck-top-pdf-pattern

It is the second version I made – the first one was an XXL as per my measurements but with the neckline raised by 2.5 cm. It was too big in almost every dimension except through my hips. It was made up in a beautiful blue shirting cotton but that wasn’t enough to save it. It has already been donated.

The second one was a XL bust out to XXL hips plus 2.5 cm removed in the bodice above the dart and through the sleeve and then the neck also raised by 2.5 cm.

It’s still not quite right – the cap sleeves pull when I move my arms forward. I doubt I’ll make another one unless I use a knit.

The fabric is lovely though – an embroidered linen cotton remnant from my local Spotlight. It is also from the stash, but it has only been marinating for 3 years.

Stash busting, three garments I can wear and two I love!

***EDITED to add how I do a petite adjustment to the bodice***

I’m very surprised to find that I couldn’t easily point Sandra to a youtube or blog post from someone else that explained how I do this. Either I haven’t looked well enough or what I do is different to what everyone else does. Or perhaps both.

This comes with several warnings:

  1. Writing tutorials is a skill that I don’t have – it’s highly likely that none of this will make sense.
  2. Drawing simple diagrams is also a skill I don’t have – it’s not going to be pleasing to the eye.
  3. This works for me but possibly works for no-one else on the earth – try on something unimportant, like a muslin/toile before you commit to this!

The green lines A, B and C are your cutting lines

  • Line A: draw this in starting at the centre front and perpendicular to centre front, at least 2 cm below neckline (if you’re doing a 2 cm petite-ing, more if you’re doing more, less if less) out to just before before the armscye stitching line
  • Line B: draw this in also perpendicular to centre front but start 2 cm below armscye on the side seam (or more or less depending on your adjustment) and stop at about the same position as Line A.
  • Line C: this line joins Line A and B and is parallel to the centre front

The purple dashed lines are the lines you’re adjusting to.

  • Measure up 2 cm (or more or less, depending on your adjustment) from lines A and B and draw in a line parallel to them (this is the purple dashed lines).

The red bit is the amount you’re going to remove.

  • Cut along your green lines.
  • Shift the pattern piece up to the dashed lines and tape it back together

Now do the same to the back bodice piece

Why I do it this way:

  • It doesn’t change the armscye, which means you don’t have to adjust the sleeve. I don’t usually have an issue with where the sleeve joins the bodice being too low so I avoid having to make this additional change.
  • It takes length out only above the bust, which is where I seem to need it to get the bust point in the right spot for me.

This isn’t what I did on the square neck too (I just took 2 cm out from centre front through the cut on sleeves) but it is what I normally do and what I did for the V neck Burda top.

Sandra: Hope this helps and good luck with your fitting journey

Does this make sense? Does anyone else do this? Is there a better way to do this?

Pink linen shirt dress: Burda 07/2004 #135

I’ve really gone back to the archives of my Burda magazine collection for this one. Moving up into the Plus size range will do that to you!

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This pattern is so old that the only Burda website that has it is the Russian one: : https://burdastyle.ru/vikroyki/platya/plate-burda-2004-7-136/

I’d learnt from my mistakes about sizing and this time I traced a size 46 with a 2 cm petite adjustment above the bust and out to size 48 hips. I omitted the band on the sleeves and went for the shorter length of style #136.

This dress is wonderfully comfortable to wear. Being made from lovely linen helps.

This is a very beautiful cross dye linen from Emmaonesock in hot pink fibers in the warp and sand in the weft. It has gorgeous sheen IRL and an overall salmon pink colour when you’re not looking at it up close.

I purchased it in 2018 so this particular fabric isn’t available anymore but it looks like other similar cross dye linens are still on the site. Yes I am tempted. No I haven’t succumbed. Yet. Also, I’m not affiliated in any way, just a very satisfied customer.

I wondered about the smallish hip level patch pockets. Would they look like they’d slid down from the bust? Would they add too much of a lab coat vibe? The verdict? – they are just fine.

And all those wrinkles? It’s linen. I’m embracing the wrinkles. These photos were taken after the dress had been worn for most of the day, but it did look almost this wrinkly within about 10 minutes…

I used ‘rescue buttons’ from a shirt of Chris’s that would have otherwise ended up in landfill, and thread leftover from a previous project. I love it when I have everything I need for a project already in the stash.

I didn’t interface the button band, and I folded it to the right side rather than the wrong side. There really is no wrong side to this fabric, and I liked the faux sewn on band effect this gave me.

I love this dress! Beautiful fabric is key. Did I say that already?!

Rome Collection in Spain

I want to add my love for Closet Case Patterns Rome collection.

I’ve made at least one of all the patterns in this collection. And tested them out on holiday in Spain.

Firstly, my least favourite, the Fiore skirt. This is nothing to do with the pattern, but is all to do with me – I’ve never been a fan of A-line skirts. But the asymmetric wrap style  of view C drew me in, and I succumbed.

Here it is in Madrid.

I’ve got to admit that this is a glorious skirt to wear. Love the pocket, love the easy breezy style. Just don’t think A-lines are the best style for me.

And now let me tell you about the Pietra pants. My first test version was the cropped straight leg view in a red cotton twill of dubious provenance. A long term stash dweller.

I lengthened the legs, and then chopped the extra length off again. They got taken on holiday too and they’ve seen quite a lot of wear! Pictured here in wonderful Salamanca.

I prefer to wear them without my top tucked in but the clever pattern design of a flat front means they look okay tucked too, in a retro-ish high waist sort of way.

The second version I made was the wide legged full length pants in linen.

These went to Spain too. Here they are in Seville. Glorious! Just what you need in hot weather.

Let’s move on to the Cielo top.

In front of Madrid’s palace glowing in the early morning light. Feeling smug about my top!

And back home. Still love it just as much. This first version was in an embroidered cotton linen blend. I added extra to the length but ended up hemming it only 3 cm longer. So a totally unnecessary modification!

The bust darts from the armscye are different but perfectly functional.

My second Cielo was made in a cotton with an embroidered border purchased in Barcelona.

I didn’t have enough fabric to include the bottom part of the lantern sleeve, nor did I have enough of the border for the sleeves. Red ric-rac to the rescue.

I very quickly moved onto the dress version. I so want to make several hundred more of these and a couple of millions other versions of the top.

I’ve had this glorious pink boucle in my stash for years. It was a souvenir from Paris and had a lot of expectation built into it. One of those “too good to use” fabrics. I’m so happy to be wearing it at last!

I used a very light weight interfacing on the pocket openings just in case they sagged. To reduce thickness in the pockets I used a lighter weight fabric for part of the pocket bag. I also interfaced the back yoke and facing. But nothing else. I’m hoping the loose weave of the boucle stands up to wear and tear.

Such a great shape. So comfortable to wear.

In conclusion. A fabulous set of patterns. Perfect for holidays and everyday life.

Highly recommended!

Unlined linen jacket: Burda 02/2009 #115

This jacket was inspired by @groovygreylook. Meridy posted a purple linen version to her Instagram and I remembered how much I liked this Burda magazine pattern.

That was all I needed to search through the archives, trace it off and cut out my fabric.

This is style 115 from the 02/2009 issue. Almost vintage!

Жакет

I made this I in a size 44 and I think the fit is just fine.

(early morning photography = odd light )

Of course getting fit right in a boxy style is really only about the shoulders. The dart could be a touch too low and no doubt there are other things that you can see if you look at it very critically. But it’s an unlined and not very structured crumpled linen jacket. The fit is fine!

I used a coated linen that was a souvenir from Barcelona. And because this was such a fabulous fabric I took a little bit extra care.

Hong Kong seam treatments on the sleeves, shoulders and facings.

That’s fusible interfacing on the bias edges of the raglan sleeve seams. I used quite a bit of interfacing in this project, even in the hem (hoping this will stop it rolling up after sitting. So far it’s working!)

Flat felled seams through the main body of the jacket and top stitching.

Precision sewing. This is the shoulder. Ask me about unpicking and lots of pins.

Lots of top stitching. Did I say that already? And extra nice buttons

I particularly like these pockets. They were fun to construct and they are delightfully capacious.

I’m very pleased with this jacket. It’s the perfect smart casual jacket for cooler summer evenings.

I need to reacquaint myself with the rest of my old Burda magazines. Who knows what other treasures lie therein?

My new favourite dress: Lynn Mizono V1410

I am very late to V1410 party, but I am very very happy to have finally got there!

This is an awesome pattern and so much fun to wear.

Image result for v1410 pattern

I made two versions in quick succession in January and have since struggled to get photos taken. I’d like my eyes to be open, I’d prefer not to look like a crazy person, my double chin to not make too much of an appearance and not to look 10 kilos more than I used to weigh in my twenties. Too much to ask? Seems so. Hence I’m going with the photos I have.

The first version was made up as a size 14 in a cotton from IKEA.

I cut out a size 14 after comparing the shoulders and neck to a Burda size 44 sleeveless top. This pattern has a lot of ease built in everywhere. Been a long time since I was a size 14 in Vogue! I also took the neck up 5 cm after reading lots of reviews of this pattern which talked about the neck being low.

As it turned out, 5 cm was too much.

I went back to the just 2.5 cm higher (where the size 22 cutting line is at the bottom of the scoop) for the second version.

I love the almost ridiculous ballooned out side seams of this pattern. Another very clever aspect is the adjustable length. There are three buttons up each side seam and a buttonhole in the hem on both sides.

Above is what it looks like inside with the hem up to the first internal button.

And below is me straightening the hem after buttoning it up – it is possible to change the hem length in public. But not advisable.

The top buttons makes it quite short. Definitely the party version.

This is my second version. It’s made up in a black linen nylon blend.

I added pockets to the sides seams of the second version. And yes the buttons are red. So much easier to see! Imagine looking for black buttons on the inside of a black dress.

I skipped the buttonhole for the second version and added a loop of fine elastic instead. Much easier to use.

Here are the loops in use to adjust the dress to knee length and give me a cocktail dress to wear to the Adelaide Symphony Orchestra’s season opening night. It was too hot an evening to dress up in a fancy frock and heels but this dress still made me feel fabulous.

I love it full length too. Don’t have a photo of it but it’s the same as the blue dandelion print one, except more sophisticated…even if I am not.

I predict the black version is going to be the perfect travel dress. Multiple lengths and looks will make it versatile, the black linen is excellent in hot weather and the nylon in the blend gives it a sheen that elevates it to potential evening wear. I haven’t even started thinking about the layering options for colder days. Tights, leggings, T-shirt’s, turtlenecks …

Thank you Lynn Mizono.

Trying to perfect a pattern

I’ve now made six dresses based on BurdaStyle 02/2014 #141. Six. Just this year. Yes, that surprised me too!

Version 5 was made in a novelty weave fabric in deep stash and originally from Gorgeous Fabrics labelled Maggy London.

The fabric lacks body and collapsed a bit under my bust so I added some vertical darts.

The sleeves are too tight in this version and I’ll probably remove them and make it sleeveless. But I haven’t got around to it yet. I think it may be more dinner date without the sleeves. With the sleeves it seems more lady who lunches or fancy office wear.

Version 6 is a lovely linen shift.

I love this dress. I purchased the fabric in a soft finishing shop in Wellington, New Zealand and would like to have a sofa covered in it too as well as curtains and dining chairs. Yes I really do love it!

It’s a heavy weight linen and the perfectly on grain print and centred symmetrical pattern make pattern matching and invisible zip insertion a dream. I should make more garments from soft furnishing fabric.

I lined this dress in white cotton batiste. It’s a delight to wear on a hot summers day.

I’ve surprised myself looking back at how many times I’ve repeated other patterns as well this year. Is this a sign I’m maturing as a sewist or just a lack of imagination?!

Something old and something new

Well this is an unexpected bonus. My new sparkly linen top works very well with one of my old favourites.

This skirt was recently rescued from the depths of my wardrobe. It’s a bit faded but still loved!

But let me tell you about the fabric in my top.

It’s a coated linen from The Fabric Store in Sydney.

No I don’t live in Sydney. But I have worked out I can fit in a quick visit to The Fabric Store on the way to the airport if my Sydney meeting finishes by 3:30 PM. And lots of them do.

Both The Fabric Store, and Tessuti Fabrics Surry Hills store, are located close to Central train station. Hop off the T8 line out to Sydney airport. Take a short walk there and back, then continue on your way to catch your flight. With new fabric…

The Fabric Store also has an excellent and extensive selection of Liberty. Even some on sale. I resisted. This time.

So jealous of sydneysiders with these two stores as their local fabric stores!

This is a repeat pattern make. I didn’t notice that the darts are a smidge low the first time I made this. But this plain linen shows everything! Even wrinkles after 5 minutes of wear.

At my age (#fashionoverfifty), I’m embracing the wrinkles!

This is an excellent pattern. Uses less than a metre of fabric. I can see several more in my sewing future!

Bella and Kalle in pink linen for summer

Cool loose-fitting linen dresses are a must for summer holidays.

Bella and Kalle provided just the right styles and my local Spotlight had a good selection of linens to pick from. All I needed to add was a sewing machine and some time!

Pink floral Bella

The linen was a little see through so I lined with cotton batiste.

Not strictly necessary, but it does make the colours pop, and there are no awkward underwear show though moments.

Such a lovely loose style that the lining has no impact on its comfort in hot weather. It might even ‘improve’ it by making it more tent like?!

I shortened the sleeves, slashed them and added ties. Sort of like a full bicep adjustment, but with a style outcome.

Flamingo Kalle

This is such a satisfying pattern to make. Last time I made the crop top, lengthened, with the stand collar. This time it was the shirt dress, at the length as drafted, again with the stand collar.

So many satisfying details.

I added pockets. The same lovely ones that are included in the Bella dress pattern. Because. Pockets.

I used pale pink pre-made bias binding rather than self-fabric bias on the hem because I didn’t have quite enough fabric.

Why pale pink when the flamingos were white and so were the buttons?

Availability –  within 2 metres of sewing machine. Funny – I would never have selected this ahead of white, but I think it works better than white would have, on the finished garment. I have so much still to learn!

But one thing I have already learned is that this is an awesome pattern.

Baby pink linen Kalle shirt

I wish I was writing about having made multiple Closet Case Kalle shirts and shirts dresses.

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Sadly, I have only made one. So far.

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This is such a great pattern.

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I made the cropped version with the faced hem, but with 10 cm extra length.

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I like the idea of the chest pocket, but I added it to the wrong side. Oops.

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I was lazy and drafted a grown on button band rather than cutting  out a separate piece. I also didn’t interface anything. Don’t tell the sewing police.

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Aren’t the buttons delightful? They are souvenirs – vintage buttons purchased at the Portobello Road Markets.

I love this shirt.

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This first version is made in a linen cotton blend from Spotlight. I have several other virtual versions made in lace, patterned linen, chambray, silk chiffon….

I just have these things called work and Christmas and a family wedding that are preventing my sewing plans proceeding in an orderly fashion.

Anyone else have that problem? Any solutions, apart from winning the lottery?

Should I make a shirt dress to wear to the wedding? Should I make the bridesmaid a shirt dress? Don’t answer these last questions. I know I want to.

 

 

Using the ‘right’ side of the fabric

Thank you for your kind comments on my last post about my reversible skirt. It is a bit ridiculous that making such a simple garment has been so pleasing, but it seems that lots of you are with me on this!

Now, I promised to show you the more mundane use of this fabric.

This simple dress is version #4 of Burdastyle 07/2011 #131.

It’s much roomier than the last version I made. I’m putting that down to the much looser weave of linen cut on the straight grain for #4 versus using tightly woven cotton cut on the cross grain for #3.

Linen and loose fitting – perfect for hot humid weather when I still need to look pulled together. It’s already been worn multiple times.

This time I cut the sleeves on (I butted the side bodice and cap sleeve pattern pieces together, ignoring the wrongly marked seam numbers)

The focus on pattern matching was balancing the vertical stripes down the centre back and front and matching horizontally though the side seams, – not the shoulders! As you can see.

Next up:

The last warm weather shirt dress for Felicity, in her choice of quilting cotton. Australiana rules!

The dilemma of reversible fabrics

I know which side of the fabric is the right side, but what if I like the wrong side too? That makes it an unintentionally reversible fabric, right?

This fabric is a delightful Italian linen from a high end English menswear line. I was lucky enough to visit Ditto fabrics in Brighton in the UK last year, and this is one of my souvenirs. The right side is the classic navy and white plaid. The reverse has a beautiful bronze coating.

So, what to do?

I did what any sensible sewist would do. I squeezed two garments out of my fabric length.

And made one of them reversible. (I think that means I made three garments…)

The main garment hasn’t even been photographed yet. The squeezed-out-of-the-remnant-and-made-reversible simple pencil skirt? That’s today’s story!

The hem is fringed.

I zigzigged and then pulled out threads

The waist was finished on the brown side with grosgrain.

I turned under the seam allowance at the waist and topstitched the ribbon on. Hardly noticeable on the ‘right’ side.

The darts were top stitched down too.

The zip was exposed on the navy side

And even a more ‘exposed’ on the brown side

I ran the grosgrain ribbon down the seam underneath the zip, to cover the seam allowance.

Looks like that ribbon goes all the way from top to bottom, doesn’t it?!

The other seam got flat fell treatment

and a bias strip covered slit at the hem.

I love this skirt!

Linen wrap skirt: BurdaStyle 02/2015 #109

More sewing for Felicity

This skirt was made with the same fabulous embroidered linen I’d used earlier for a boxy top.

It’s a lovely wrap style with box pleats front and back and enormous pockets.

Pattern: BurdaStyle 02/2015 #109B

Size: 36-44, I made a 42. It’s a bit big on Felicity, but, being a wrap style, this just means the centre front pleat overlaps a bit at the waist

I ran out of fabric and had to piece the waistband with plain white linen: Felicity’s skirt has a seam at the top of the waistband with plain white linen as the backing, and all of the back pieces and ties completely in plain white. She wrapped the ties back to the front in these photos and then wore a boxy over blouse, so you can’t see them at all.

I top stitched the pleats and flat felled the side seams. And then covered the seams up with enormous wrap around pockets. You could fit a novel in these, with room to spare!

I like this skirt and this style a lot. Perhaps I might steal it from her wardrobe. Or make myself one of my own…

Short boxy tops: BurdaStyle 06/2015 #106

There has been a bit of (totally justified IMO) criticism of Burdastyle magazines lately.But it’s not all bad. Some of those boxy patterns actually turn out alright.

Let me show you my evidence

The cute Felicity version

The trial version without the collar and tie for Mum

For a boxy top I say this is a bit of a winner!

Technical Details

Pattern: BurdaStyle 06/2015 #106

For the mum version, I traced off the dress, BurdaStyle 06/2015 #107 at the blouse level

Size: 36-44, I made a 42 for both Felicity and myself. No we are not the same size. It’s boxy- no need for fancy fitting finnanigans

As you can see, I just turned the sleeve hem under. No proper 3 cm hem for me!

Fabrics

Both are from my local Spotlight store. Mine is a Japanese cotton, Felicity’s is a linen cotton mix with very cute embroidery.

I did flat felled seams on the linen. First time. Woohoo! Love my flat felling foot. Might have done them inside out. Oh well. Beginner.

I didn’t follow Burda’s instructions to cut the button band on the bias. I also doubled it for a bit of extra strength for the button holes (but didn’t interface it)

Buttons

Let me tell you about the buttons.

Mine are vintage hand-me–downs from a lovely elderly church friend. She’s English so they could even be from the UK via a wool coat that gone to a better place.

Yes you can see the selvedge showing through on the button placket. Yes I didn’t use interfacing. Yes I am slap dash. It was a trial version… and I excused??!

Felicity’s buttons are vintage courtesy of Portobello Road markets. Sewing souvenirs are the best souvenirs.

And for a trial version, mine has already had a surprising number of public outings.

I think I like this pattern!

 

The mindfulness dress: BurdaStyle 07/2011 #131

No I haven’t found that pattern yet.

But lets talk about something different.

Why should the mindfulness colouring in trend be limited to paper?

Fabric can be coloured in too!

I had a lot of fun with this dress.

And who says it over? Boring meeting? I can whip out my textas and zen out some more. There’s plenty more to do..

This dress started as a toile. The fabric has been in my stash for some time.

I wasn’t too concerned about the selvedge showing on the centre back seam, because this was a toile.

Does it really matter if part of the text printed on the selvedge “Designed by Sissi Edholm & Lisa Ullenius 2005 IKEA of Sweden AB” shows on the slit?? (It was deep stash. 2005 makes it almost vintage!)

Then I tried it on, and really liked the dress as well as really liking the pattern (the pattern was subsequently used for the teal party frock).

This would be a great hot weather dress I thought. Specially in linen, which is exactly what this fabric is. Pity about the selvedge.

So I lined and finished it. And then did a bit of colouring in.

Technical details

Pattern: BurdaStyle 07/2011 #131

Size: 36-44. I made a 44.

Fabric: Linen outer from IKEA (deep stash) and a lining from cotton batiste with a light sparkly coating from Ferrier Fashion Fabrics– it feels lovely against my skin.

The black and white linen got some extra colour round the waist thanks to textas.

These were not special fabric pens. I did a trial run with a scrap and washed it. None of the colours I wanted to use ran, except purple, and maybe red just a teensy nit. The red did bleed a bit after the first wash too.

Bleach might turn out to be my new best friend.

Changes I made:

I moved the zip and the walking slit to the back and fully lined the dress rather than just faced the neck line.

The sleeves stick out. They also stick out on other sewists who made this dress with sleeves, like Doctor T and njnow02.

I double and triple checked that the pieces went together in the right way. So either they are marked incorrectly, or the model in the fashion shoot has amazingly broad shoulders.

This is a great pattern. I need to make another version! I do have the traced off pattern filed away where it should. Now, back to looking for the other one…