Crazy Cat Lady Coat: BurdaStyle 12/2011 #114 and some more European travel

Isn’t it ridiculous? In a good way. Of course.

The zip is functional and accentuates the design’s lovey boule shape.

Flattering? No.

Fun? Yes!

Technical details

Pattern: BurdaStyle 12/2011 #114

Size: 38-46, I made a 42.

Fabric: Cotton canvas upholstery weight fabric, from IKEA, lined with Sunsilky – a polyester lining with good breathability.

Changes I made: This one was made to Burda’s plan, apart from the petersham trim. I auditioned some black trim, but it wasn’t adding much. Those cats are enough!

Pattern matching like a boss. Those cat faces weren’t quite symmetrical, but I didn’t let that put me off!

I didn’t finish the coat in time to take it with me. But as it turned out, the weather was so marvelous I didn’t really need it.

So where did I go?

Nyon, Switzerland

I was at Macrowine 2016, a wine science conference held at Changins, Haute Ecole de Viticulture et Oenologie.

Most of the Changins team, with the Chair of the conference, Julien Ducruet (front left), Vicente Ferreira, Zaragoza, Chair of the next Macrowine in 2018 (front middle) and Maurizio Ugliano, Verona, Chair of Macrowine 2020 (front right).

Great people, excellent conference and a wonderful location for both the conference and associated social events and vineyard excursions

The Lavaux vineyards, overlooking Lake Geneva

Chateau de Nyon. Dates back to the 13th century but rebuilt in the 15th. A lovely location for welcome drinks.


An exhibit at the Olympic Games Museum, Lausanne, where the gala dinner was held

Who would have thought that I’d find something of sewing interest at the Olympic Games Museum in Lausanne?

This is the first Olympic flag sewn by seamstresses at Le Bon Marché in Paris. I know they would not have had the machines we have today, but the lack of precision cutting and sewing did surprise me.

Conference outfit of the day photo

Featuring a new skirt. It’s my TNT pencil skirt pattern with two small side slits rather than a walking vent at the back. Worn with a Paco Peralta cowl top and a RTW jacket.

Burgundy

After Macrowine, I visited colleagues at Groupe ESC Dijon-Bourgogne, School of
Wine and Spirits in Dijon, France. We had coffee and croissants at the University and then went on a vineyard tour. Vineyard tours are very important things to do for grape and wine scientists!

Biodynamic grapegrowing in Burgundy includes one horse- ( and one woman) power cultivation

My tour guides were Prof Roberta Crouch, seconded from the University of Adelaide, and Claude Chapuis, associate professor of French culture, viticulture and oenology, pictured here at Domain Maurice Chapuis. Claude is from a winegrowing family going back five generations. #LocalsAreTheBestTourGuides! We stopped to pick up the family dog so he could come for the walk around the Aloxe-Corton vineyards too.

As well as teaching, Claude also writes books about wine in German, French and English: like this one I came across whilst browsing in the bookshop later.

He is a wonderfully knowledgeable, interesting and totally lovely man.

Château de Clos de Vougeot (top left) Château de Corton André (centre), and other vineyards in Aloxe-Corton.

The Clos de Vougeot vineyards were established by Cistercian monks in the 12th century. Château de Corton André is a ‘youngster’ from the late 19th century. Claude had some very interesting stories about the owners of some of these beautiful chateaux. Gambling debts…parties…scandals..

At Domaine Maurice Chapuis.

Maurice, Claude’s brother, joined us later. The cellars were very atmospheric: mouldy dusty bottles and St Vincent, the patron suit of winegrowers and winemakers. The wines were magnificent. I’m in Burdastyle (cotton skirt is a modification of 12/2013 #109, silk blouse is 07/2011 #121).

Hospices de Beaune

This hospital for the poor was found in the 15th century by Philip the Good (great name!) and has been in use as a hospital up until the 1970’s. Claude was born there. Probably his parents, grandparents, great grand parents and great great grandparents were too. Amazing stuff.

Historical winemaking equipment, including a mobile press (bottom right)

This small exhibition was tucked away in a corner of Beaune and would be easy to miss. Not if you are with Claude.

Then … I met Felicity in Paris and we had delightful mother and daughter time in Paris and London. And bought some fabric and lace and buttons. But those stories will have to wait for another post..

Tarragona

Ancient roman city in Spain. Still a bustling university town today.

Great food.

Great roman ruins, too. This was the view from my hotel room. The scaffolding was from a recent concert held in the amphitheater

The Priorat wine region is close to Tarragona. It’s a very hilly region with most of the vineyards terraced. Hard to believe this region is still commercially viable!

It’s a great place to visit, and some of the wineries are particularly picturesque.