My Missoni ‘Tee’ jumper: BurdaStyle 06/2016 #101

Back in 2015, I was incredibly fortunate enough to acquire this Missoni summer weight wool/viscose knit from Liz of designerfabricsaustralia.

It’s been sewn into many imaginary garments over the last five years. But they never got past the planning stage and actually into my wardrobe. It was one of those too-good-to-sew fabrics. Until now.

This is style 101 from BurdaStyle 06/2016 or #101burda06/2016 in instragramspeak

A very simple pattern – just right to showcase my Missoni knit.

I cut out the patterns pieces so that the hem of the sleeves and the front and back were on the zigzag selvedge. This meant the upper bodice/ sleeve piece stretched across the complete width of my fabric from selvedge to selvedge.

I spent a lot of time working out how to cut this out of my slightly too small length of fabric and I’m pleased how well it tuned out with all the zigzag edges meeting and matching. What I didn’t do is pay enough attention to getting the flow of the zigzags going the same way on the front and back. If I’d done this the shoulder seams would have been patterned matched. Not mismatched like they are, as you can see above. Oh well. Live and learn.

I stabilised the neck and shoulder seams (about 13 cm down from the neck) with a strip of very lightweight interfacing. The neck was then finished with bias binding.

I love it!

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What I’ve been cooking this summer

This summer I’ve discovered a fabulous new salad, two great cakes and a new gluten free cookie recipe.

Carrot and edamame salad with soy ginger dressing

Salad:

  • 1  x 450g packet of frozen shelled edamame beans
  • 2 medium carrots, shredded or grated
  • 2 spring onions or half a red onion, finely sliced
  • a generous few handfuls of salad greens, some shredded
  • 2 tablespoons sesame seeds, lightly toasted

Dressing:

  • 1 tablespoon grated ginger
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 4 tablespoons soy sauce
  • freshly ground black pepper

Bring a large saucepan of salted water to the boil and cook the edamame for 2-3 minutes or until tender (they float to the surface). Drain well and run under cold water to stop them cooking further.

To make the dressing, put everything into  screw cap jar or small bowl and mix well to combine.

Combine all the salad ingredients in a large serving bowl. Mix well then drizzle over the dressing. There will probably be more dressing than needed, but it is delicious with whatever salad you are making the next day, or over cooked rice or noodles.

This is a slight adaptation of a recipe by Emma Galloway published in Cuisine in issue 197, Nov/Dec 2019.

Chocolate chip sour cream coffee cake

Cake

  • 120 grams unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 300 grams caster sugar
  • 3 large eggs, separated
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 2 cups sour cream
  • 390 grams plain flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons bicarb soda
  • 3/4 teaspoon fine salt

Filling and Topping

  • 2 cups dark chocolate chips
  • 100 grams granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Heat oven to 175°C.

Butter a by 23 x 33 cm baking pan and line the bottom with baking paper. This makes a big cake! I used a roasting pan because none of my cake tins are that large.

In a large bowl, cream butter and 300 grams sugar. Beat in egg yolks and vanilla.

Whisk flour, bicarb soda, baking powder and salt together into a separate bowl.

Alternately mix in sour cream and then dry ingredients into butter mixture until both are used up and the batter is smooth and very thick.

In a medium bowl with clean beaters, beat eggs whites until stiff, then fold gently into batter.

In a small dish, combine the cinnamon and remaining 100 grams caster sugar for filling and topping.

Spread half the cake batter in the bottom of prepared pan and spread smooth. Sprinkle with half of cinnamon-sugar mixture and 1 cup of chocolate chips. Dollop remaining cake batter over filling in spoonfuls. Use a spatula to gently spread it over the filling and smooth the top. Sprinkle batter with remaining cinnamon-sugar and remaining chocolate chips.

Bake for 40 to 50 minutes, rotating halfway through, until a tester inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. Let cool in pan.

This recipe is from Smitten Kitchen, published online at https://smittenkitchen.com/2006/11/chocolate-chip-sour-cream-cake/

Lemon blackberry yoghurt loaf

  • 1 1/2 cups (190 grams) + 1 tablespoon (10 grams) plain flour (if you’re skipping the fruit, you can also skip the last tablespoon of flour)
  • 2 teaspoons (10 grams) baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup (230 grams) plain whole-milk yogurt
  • 1 cup plus 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 3 extra-large eggs
  • 2 teaspoons grated lemon zest (approximately 2 lemons)
  • 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 cups (about 255 grams) blackberries, frozen
  • 1/3 cup (80 ml) freshly squeezed lemon juice

Preheat the oven to 175°C. Grease a 22 by 11 by 7 cm loaf pan. Line the bottom with baking paper. Grease the sides of the pan.

Sift together 1 1/2 cups flour, baking powder, and salt into 1 bowl. In another bowl, whisk together the yogurt, 1 cup sugar, the eggs, lemon zest, vanilla and oil. Slowly whisk the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients.

Mix the berries with the remaining tablespoon of flour, and fold them very gently into the batter. Pour the batter into the prepared pan and bake for about 50 minutes, or until a cake tester placed in the center of the loaf comes out clean.

Meanwhile, cook the 1/3 cup lemon juice and remaining 1 tablespoon sugar in a small pan until the sugar dissolves and the mixture is clear. Set aside.

When the cake is done, allow it to cool in the pan for 10 minutes before flipping out onto a cooling rack. While the cake is still warm, pour the lemon-sugar mixture over the cake and allow it to soak in (a pastry brush works great for this, as does using a toothpick to make tiny holes that draw the syrup in better). Cool.

This recipe is from Smitten Kitchen, published online at https://smittenkitchen.com/2008/04/lemon-yogurt-anything-cake/

 

Salted Peanut Butter Cookies (gluten free)

Makes 26 to 28 cookies with a 1 2/3 tablespoon scoop. I used a 1 1/4 tablespoon quenelle scoop loaded up generously and made 25 cookies

  • 1 3/4 cups (335 grams) packed light brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 3/4 cups (450 grams) smooth peanut butter
  • Coarse-grained sea salt, to finish

Preheat the oven to 170°C. Line a baking sheet with baking paper.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the light brown sugar and eggs until smooth. Whisk in vanilla extract, then the peanut butter until smoothie and completely incorporated. Yes, that’s all you need to do. So easy.

Scoop out mixture onto the prepared baking sheet.  I had an appointment to attend to I put the scooped out cookies on the baking tray into the freezer for over an hour before I baked them. This is recommended to get the tallest cookies and the striations across the top of the cookies, but I did it out of necessity and poor timing.

Sprinkle the cookies lightly with coarse-grained sea salt just before baking. Bake cookies for 14 to 15 minutes. When finished, cookies should be golden at edges.

They’ll need to set on the sheet for a minute or two before they can be lifted intact to a cooling sheet. Once they have cooled completely they are crisp outside and soft inside. Delicious!

This recipe is also from Smitten Kitchen, published online at https://smittenkitchen.com/2015/10/salted-peanut-butter-cookies/

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Baby blue floral Wilder gown. Not like a nightie at all.

I have fallen hard for this pattern.

One minute I’m “why is it so popular? It looks like a nightie. Or little house on the prairie style. So not for me.”

The next, I’m totally smitten by the gorgeousness of the Wilder made by M of Nonsuch Sewing and so many other beautiful Wilders appearing in my feed.

Pattern duly purchased and plans made to make my own.

Yes it does look like a nightgown. But (I tell myself) a cool, swishy, loose and just gorgeous to wear nightgown.

The technical details

What size to make? My measurements put me into XL so that’s what I went with. Or so I thought. I hadn’t paid attention to the test square. I’d printed the pattern out at about 90%. My “XL” was closer to an M.

To attempt to compensate for this error I reduced the seam allowances through the bodice and sleeves from 5/8 to 3/8 inch (apart from the centre front which I took down to 1/2 inch).

The ‘fit’ seems to be fine. Although I’m not sure my shoulders would be okay if I gathered the neckline up to my neck. Lucky I prefer it looser and lower.

I made the gathered skirt layers wider and longer by about 10 cm in length and width to account for the pattern repeat of my fabric. This made the dress length floor grazing. I took off the extra 20 cm of length from the bottom layer.

I used a charming floral woven viscose from Spotlight for this first version.

I suspect I’m going to be seeing more of my garment labels on this pattern.

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Festive Cielos

My love affair with the Cielo dress pattern continues.

What better fabric to use in late December than Jocelyn Proust Christmas themed fabrics?

The back yokes and sleeve bands are a brilliant place to use all those other cute Christmas remnants.

I didn’t consult with Felicity about her contrast fabric so the contrast sleeve bands are still unsewn.

Love this pattern!

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You are my sunshine: #117burda04/2019

“This is my favourite thing ever that your mum has made for you”

I’ve got to agree with that!

The lovely fabric I used is a cotton and silk blend Tory Burch gauze from The Fabric Store.

I used a double layer of fabric for the bodice and skirt. The flounces are a single layer and you can see how delightfully light this fabric is.

I love this design with its asymmetrical twist and flounces.

This pattern is from the April 2019 issue of BurdaStyle

I traced off a size 40 with a 2.5 cm FBA. It ended up a little tight through the bust and hips so I took the side seams out in both these spots.

I didn’t trace a facing for the neck or arms yes but instead used premade bias binding in beige. Somewhat regretting this because the difference in fabric weight has resulted in some puckering. Clearly not enough regret to remove it! And no complaints from the recipient!

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Kielo wrap dress

Why did this take so long? Both this pattern and this fabric have been waiting for years!

This is Named Patterns Kielo Wrap Dress, made in a ITY knit from Gorgeous fabrics with a lot of stretch but great recovery.

Such a cleaver design.

Hours of fun tying it different ways..

It is just as lovely in IRL as if is when posing for blog photos in my front garden.

The gorgeous M from Nonsuch  and I heading out to the fabulous Adelaide Sewists Christmas Function

This is such a great pattern. I already have several more versions (knee length, with sleeves, in a linen…) in my imaginary wardrobe.

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Rome Collection in Spain

I want to add my love for Closet Case Patterns Rome collection.

I’ve made at least one of all the patterns in this collection. And tested them out on holiday in Spain.

Firstly, my least favourite, the Fiore skirt. This is nothing to do with the pattern, but is all to do with me – I’ve never been a fan of A-line skirts. But the asymmetric wrap style  of view C drew me in, and I succumbed.

Here it is in Madrid.

I’ve got to admit that this is a glorious skirt to wear. Love the pocket, love the easy breezy style. Just don’t think A-lines are the best style for me.

And now let me tell you about the Pietra pants. My first test version was the cropped straight leg view in a red cotton twill of dubious provenance. A long term stash dweller.

I lengthened the legs, and then chopped the extra length off again. They got taken on holiday too and they’ve seen quite a lot of wear! Pictured here in wonderful Salamanca.

I prefer to wear them without my top tucked in but the clever pattern design of a flat front means they look okay tucked too, in a retro-ish high waist sort of way.

The second version I made was the wide legged full length pants in linen.

These went to Spain too. Here they are in Seville. Glorious! Just what you need in hot weather.

Let’s move on to the Cielo top.

In front of Madrid’s palace glowing in the early morning light. Feeling smug about my top!

And back home. Still love it just as much. This first version was in an embroidered cotton linen blend. I added extra to the length but ended up hemming it only 3 cm longer. So a totally unnecessary modification!

The bust darts from the armscye are different but perfectly functional.

My second Cielo was made in a cotton with an embroidered border purchased in Barcelona.

I didn’t have enough fabric to include the bottom part of the lantern sleeve, nor did I have enough of the border for the sleeves. Red ric-rac to the rescue.

I very quickly moved onto the dress version. I so want to make several hundred more of these and a couple of millions other versions of the top.

I’ve had this glorious pink boucle in my stash for years. It was a souvenir from Paris and had a lot of expectation built into it. One of those “too good to use” fabrics. I’m so happy to be wearing it at last!

I used a very light weight interfacing on the pocket openings just in case they sagged. To reduce thickness in the pockets I used a lighter weight fabric for part of the pocket bag. I also interfaced the back yoke and facing. But nothing else. I’m hoping the loose weave of the boucle stands up to wear and tear.

Such a great shape. So comfortable to wear.

In conclusion. A fabulous set of patterns. Perfect for holidays and everyday life.

Highly recommended!

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